Fragmented mitochondrial genomes in two suborders of parasitic lice of eutherian mammals (Anoplura and Rhynchophthirina, Insecta)

Shao, Renfu, Barker, Stephen C., Li, Hu, Song, Simon, Poudel, Shreekanta and Su, Yuan (2015) Fragmented mitochondrial genomes in two suborders of parasitic lice of eutherian mammals (Anoplura and Rhynchophthirina, Insecta). Scientific Reports, 5 17389.1-17389.11. doi:10.1038/srep17389


Author Shao, Renfu
Barker, Stephen C.
Li, Hu
Song, Simon
Poudel, Shreekanta
Su, Yuan
Title Fragmented mitochondrial genomes in two suborders of parasitic lice of eutherian mammals (Anoplura and Rhynchophthirina, Insecta)
Journal name Scientific Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2045-2322
Publication date 2015-11-30
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/srep17389
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Start page 17389.1
End page 17389.11
Total pages 11
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Parasitic lice (order Phthiraptera) infest birds and mammals. The typical animal mitochondrial (mt) genome organization, which consists of a single chromosome with 37 genes, was found in chewing lice in the suborders Amblycera and Ischnocera. The sucking lice (suborder Anoplura) known, however, have fragmented mt genomes with 9–20 minichromosomes. We sequenced the mt genome of the elephant louse, Haematomyzus elephantis – the first species of chewing lice investigated from the suborder Rhynchophthirina. We identified 33mt genes in the elephant louse, which were on 10 minichromosomes. Each minichromosome is 3.5–4.2kb in size and has 2–6 genes. Phylogenetic analyses of mt genome sequences confirm that the elephant louse is more closely related to sucking lice than to the chewing lice in the Amblycera and Ischnocera. Our results indicate that mt genome fragmentation is shared by the suborders Anoplura and Rhynchophthirina. Nine of the 10mt minichromosomes of the elephant louse differ from those of the sucking lice (Anoplura) known in gene content and gene arrangement, indicating that distinct mt karyotypes have evolved in Anoplura and Rhynchophthirina since they diverged ~92million years ago.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Fri, 04 Dec 2015, 10:24:42 EST by Mrs Louise Nimwegen on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences