Pregnancy and intimate partner violence in Canada: a comparison of victims who were and were not abused during pregnancy

Taillieu, Tamara L., Brownridge, Douglas A., Tyler, Kimberly A., Chan, Ko Ling, Tiwari, Agnes and Santos, Susy C. (2015) Pregnancy and intimate partner violence in Canada: a comparison of victims who were and were not abused during pregnancy. Journal of Family Violence, 1-13. doi:10.1007/s10896-015-9789-4

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Author Taillieu, Tamara L.
Brownridge, Douglas A.
Tyler, Kimberly A.
Chan, Ko Ling
Tiwari, Agnes
Santos, Susy C.
Title Pregnancy and intimate partner violence in Canada: a comparison of victims who were and were not abused during pregnancy
Journal name Journal of Family Violence   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0885-7482
1573-2851
Publication date 2015-11-28
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10896-015-9789-4
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine risk factors, indicators of severity, and differences in post-violence health effects for victims who experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy compared to victims who experienced IPV outside the pregnancy period. Data were from Statistics Canada’s 2009 General Social Survey. Among IPV victims, 10.5 % experienced physical and/or sexual violence during pregnancy. Victims who had experienced violence during pregnancy were more likely than victims who were not abused during pregnancy to experience both less severe and more severe forms of violence. In fully adjusted models, younger age, separated or divorced marital status, as well as partners’ patriarchal domination, destruction of property, and drinking were significant predictors of pregnancy violence. Measures indicative of more severe violence and of a number of adverse post-violence health effects were significantly elevated among victims who experienced pregnancy violence relative to victims who were not abused during pregnancy. Implications of these findings are discussed.
Keyword Pregnancy
Intimate partner violence
Risk factors
Severity
Health effects
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 28 November 2015

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 01 Dec 2015, 13:20:26 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work