Investigating the relationships between spirituality, attachment to God, and wellbeing

Grieve, Fiona J. (2014). Investigating the relationships between spirituality, attachment to God, and wellbeing Master's Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Grieve, Fiona J.
Thesis Title Investigating the relationships between spirituality, attachment to God, and wellbeing
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-02-07
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Supervisor Judith Murray
Pieter Rossouw
Total pages 68
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Formatted abstract
Spiritualty and religion plays an important role in people’s lives, which is reflected in the rise of spiritually accommodative therapies over the last two decades. Despite this trend, there is a lack of research and training into spirituality and religion as it relates to psychotherapy in Australia, which this study attempts to address. This study had two main aims. The first aim was to investigate the relationships between spiritual and religious beliefs and wellbeing. This was assessed by comparing groups of individuals who had a belief in God, had spiritual beliefs but did not believe in God, and those who were unsure or had no spiritual or religious beliefs. No significant differences in wellbeing scores were found in this study. The second aim was to assess whether spiritual engagement – engagement in practices related to spiritual and religious beliefs such as meditation, prayer, and reading spiritual or religious literature – was influenced by one’s relationship with God. Relationship with God was assessed using the Attachment to God Inventory. When compared with the ‘secure’ type, those with an ‘insecure’ attachment to God reported significantly higher levels of engagement in spiritual practices. Furthermore, individuals with a belief in God (both secure and insecure) reported significantly higher levels of spiritual engagement than those who were spiritual but did not believe in God. This has important implications for both the practice of spiritually accommodative therapy and for future research.
Keyword Spirituality
Wellbeing
God

 
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Created: Mon, 30 Nov 2015, 13:23:24 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology