Collaborating post-occupancy: teaching and learning across architectural design and sociology

Greenop, Kelly, Stead, Naomi and Cheshire, Lynda (2015). Collaborating post-occupancy: teaching and learning across architectural design and sociology. In: Daniel K. Brown, Manfredo Manfredini, Peter McPherson, Annabel Pretty, Uwe Rieger and Mark Southcombe, Applied Collaborations: 8th International Conference and Exhibition of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia. International Conference and Exhibition of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia, Christchurch, New Zealand, (17-23). 2-3 October 2015.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Greenop, Kelly
Stead, Naomi
Cheshire, Lynda
Title of paper Collaborating post-occupancy: teaching and learning across architectural design and sociology
Conference name International Conference and Exhibition of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia
Conference location Christchurch, New Zealand
Conference dates 2-3 October 2015
Proceedings title Applied Collaborations: 8th International Conference and Exhibition of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia
Place of Publication Christchurch, New Zealand
Publisher Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia (AASA)
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISBN 9780473337100
9780473338046
Editor Daniel K. Brown
Manfredo Manfredini
Peter McPherson
Annabel Pretty
Uwe Rieger
Mark Southcombe
Start page 17
End page 23
Total pages 6
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The use of post-occupancy evaluations (POE) amongst architecture practitioners has diminished over recent decades, with research into the human use of buildings becoming largely the domain of sociologists and in-house commercial-in-confidence studies, rather than publicly available architectural forums and media. Despite this, many architects recognise the value of and need for learning from post-occupancy evaluations, of various kinds. Teaching the principles and practices of POEs is important in the training of future architects, sensitive to and ready to work with diverse client groups and on projects where novel approaches are being tried. This paper analyses the collaborations between academics from the disciplines of architecture and sociology at The University of Queensland, and the involvement of a building developer, architectural practitioners, building managers and architecture students, in the evaluation of a new multi-residential building, with a focus on the new occupants’ experiences. This live research project addressed the public housing policy problem of ‘under-occupation.’ It did so by analysing the success of a pilot social housing scheme designed to assist older occupants to ‘down-size’ from three or four bedroom suburban public housing dwellings, to new, purpose-designed one or two bedroom apartments, thus freeing the larger houses for others with greater space requirements. In this paper we discuss the effect of collaboration, in opening up genuinely novel research questions, and the presentation of real research to students, as a way of preparing them for professional architectural experiences. From preparing for interviews, to site visits and dealing with new terminology, the process of collaboration in traditionally siloed disciplinary areas has built capacities and developed avenues for future research based on mutual areas of interest across disciplines and into professions.
Keyword Post occupancy evaluation
Architecture
Sociology
Collaboration
Pedagogy
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 26 Nov 2015, 12:17:40 EST by Dr Kelly Greenop on behalf of School of Architecture