Childhood origins of adulthood noncognitive skills: the role of chronic health problems and exposure to maltreatment

Fletcher, Jason and Schurer, Stefanie (2015). Childhood origins of adulthood noncognitive skills: the role of chronic health problems and exposure to maltreatment. LCC Working Paper Series 2015-23, Institute for Social Science Research, The University of Queensland.

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Author Fletcher, Jason
Schurer, Stefanie
Title Childhood origins of adulthood noncognitive skills: the role of chronic health problems and exposure to maltreatment
School, Department or Centre Institute for Social Science Research
Institution The University of Queensland
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Series LCC Working Paper Series
Report Number 2015-23
Publication date 2015-11
Total pages 44
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Economists are increasingly interested in the health- and productivity-boosting effects of the Big Five personality traits, a widely used domain of noncognitive skills (NCS). In this study we explore whether adverse childhood experiences - physical and mental health problems and exposure to parental maltreatment - predict age 30 NCS using longitudinal data from a large, representative cohort of young US Americans. Exploiting differences across siblings to control for the confounding influences of shared environmental and genetic factors, we find significant and robust associations between childhood adversity and neuroticism, conscientiousness, and openness to experiences. Neuroticism is significantly associated with most childhood health problems and sexual abuse. We show that the effect sizes are quantitatively meaningful and adverse childhood experiences partially account for the associations between conscientiousness and earnings and educational attainment. Although our findings cannot be given a causal interpretation, they provide researchers with a set of possible explanations for why they may find a link between NCS and adulthood health and productivity.
Keyword Noncognitive skills
Personality traits
Childhood health
Maltreatment
Siblings fixed effects
Add Health
United States
Institutional Status Non-UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 17 Nov 2015, 14:58:42 EST by Francisco Paco Perales on behalf of Institute for Social Science Research