Discovery and Characterization of Human Urine Utilization by Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Streptococcus agalactiae

Ipe, Deepak S., Ben Zakour, Nouri L., Sullivan, Matthew J., Beatson, Scott A., Ulett, Kimberly B., Benjamin, William H., Davies, Mark R., Dando, Samantha J., King, Nathan P., Cripps, Allan W., Schembri, Mark A., Dougan, Gordon and Ulett, Glen C. (2016) Discovery and Characterization of Human Urine Utilization by Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Streptococcus agalactiae. Infection and Immunity, 84 1: 307-319. doi:10.1128/IAI.00938-15

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Author Ipe, Deepak S.
Ben Zakour, Nouri L.
Sullivan, Matthew J.
Beatson, Scott A.
Ulett, Kimberly B.
Benjamin, William H.
Davies, Mark R.
Dando, Samantha J.
King, Nathan P.
Cripps, Allan W.
Schembri, Mark A.
Dougan, Gordon
Ulett, Glen C.
Title Discovery and Characterization of Human Urine Utilization by Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Streptococcus agalactiae
Formatted title
Discovery and Characterization of Human Urine Utilization by Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Streptococcus agalactiae
Journal name Infection and Immunity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0019-9567
1098-5522
Publication date 2016
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1128/IAI.00938-15
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 84
Issue 1
Start page 307
End page 319
Total pages 53
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Streptococcus agalactiae causes both symptomatic cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU); however, growth characteristics of S. agalactiae in human urine have not previously been reported. Here, we describe a phenotype of robust growth in human urine observed in ABU S. agalactiae (ABSA) that was not seen among uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) strains isolated from patients with acute cystitis. In direct competition assays using pooled human urine inoculated with equal numbers of a prototype ABSA strain, designated ABSA 1014, and any one of several UPSA strains, measurement of the percentage of each strain recovered over time showed a markedly superior fitness of ABSA 1014 for urine growth. Comparative phenotype profiling of ABSA 1014 and UPSA strain 807, isolated from a patient with acute cystitis, using metabolic arrays of >2500 substrates and conditions revealed unique and specific L-Malic acid catabolism in ABSA 1014 that was absent in UPSA 807. Whole-genome sequencing also revealed divergence in malic enzyme-encoding genes between the strains predicted to impact the activity of the malate metabolic pathway. Comparative growth assays in urine comparing wild-type ABSA and gene-deficient mutants that were functionally inactivated for the malic enzyme metabolic pathway by targeted disruption of the maeE or maeK genes in ABSA, demonstrated attenuated growth of the mutants in normal human urine as well as synthetic human urine containing malic acid. We conclude that some S. agalactiae can grow in human urine, and this relates in part to malic acid metabolism, which may affect the persistence or progression of S. agalactiae ABU.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 13 Nov 2015, 11:22:32 EST by Mrs Louise Nimwegen on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences