Trends in Marine Turtle Strandings along the East Queensland, Australia Coast, between 1996 and 2013

Flint, Jaylene, Flint, Mark, Limpus, Colin James and Mills, Paul C. (2015) Trends in Marine Turtle Strandings along the East Queensland, Australia Coast, between 1996 and 2013. Journal of Marine Biology, 2015 Art No.: 848923: . doi:10.1155/2015/848923


Author Flint, Jaylene
Flint, Mark
Limpus, Colin James
Mills, Paul C.
Title Trends in Marine Turtle Strandings along the East Queensland, Australia Coast, between 1996 and 2013
Journal name Journal of Marine Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1687-9481
1687-949X
Publication date 2015-10-22
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1155/2015/848923
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2015
Issue Art No.: 848923
Total pages 7
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In-water monitoring of marine vertebrates is usually expensive while the use of stranding data can be used to provide a cost-effective estimation of disease and mortality. Strandings for Queensland are recorded in a web based database (StrandNet) managed by the Queensland Government’s Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (EHP). Data recorded in StrandNet from the east coast of Queensland between 1996 and 2013 were investigated for patterns of stranding. Significant trends in Queensland over this time were (i) an increase in the number of animals reported stranded within this study site; (ii) a species (loggerhead and green marine turtles) prevalence; (iii) a seasonal effect on different age classes stranding with most overall strandings occurring between August and November; and (iv) stranding hotspots (Moreton Bay, Hervey Bay, Rockhampton region, and Cleveland Bays) persisting throughout the study timeframe. This study suggested that intervention strategies, such as rehabilitation, should be able to be focussed on periods of heightened importance and specific localities to minimize health risks and contribute to sustainable use of resources.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 12 Nov 2015, 15:44:15 EST by Annette Winter on behalf of School of Veterinary Science