Incorporating patient preferences in the management of multiple long-term conditions: is this a role for clinical practice guidelines?

Young, Charlotte E., Boyle, Frances M., Brooker, Katie S. and Mutch, Allyson J. (2015) Incorporating patient preferences in the management of multiple long-term conditions: is this a role for clinical practice guidelines?. Journal of Comorbidity, 5 1: 122-131. doi:10.15256/joc.2015.5.53


Author Young, Charlotte E.
Boyle, Frances M.
Brooker, Katie S.
Mutch, Allyson J.
Title Incorporating patient preferences in the management of multiple long-term conditions: is this a role for clinical practice guidelines?
Journal name Journal of Comorbidity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2235-042X
Publication date 2015-11-11
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.15256/joc.2015.5.53
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Issue 1
Start page 122
End page 131
Total pages 10
Place of publication Hochwald, Switzerland
Publisher Swiss Medical Press GmbH
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Clinical practice guidelines provide an evidence-based approach to managing single chronic conditions, but their applicability to multiple conditions has been actively debated. Incorporating patient-preference recommendations and involving consumers in guideline development may enhance their applicability, but further understanding is needed. Objectives: To assess guidelines that include recommendations for comorbid conditions to determine the extent to which they incorporate patient-preference recommendations; use consumer-engagement processes during development, and, if so, whether these processes produce more patient-preference recommendations; and meet standard quality criteria, particularly in relation to stakeholder involvement. Design: A review of Australian guidelines published from 2006 to 2014 that incorporated recommendations for managing comorbid conditions in primary care. Document analysis of guidelines examined the presence of patient-preference recommendations and the consumer-engagement processes used. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation instrument was used to assess guideline quality. Results: Thirteen guidelines were reviewed. Twelve included at least one core patient-preference recommendation. Ten used consumer-engagement processes, including participation in development groups (seven guidelines) and reviewing drafts (ten guidelines). More extensive consumer engagement was generally linked to greater incorporation of patient-preference recommendations. Overall quality of guidelines was mixed, particularly in relation to stakeholder involvement. Conclusions: Guidelines do incorporate some patient-preference recommendations, but more explicit acknowledgement is required. Consumer-engagement processes used during guideline development have the potential to assist in identifying patient preferences, but further research is needed. Clarification of the consumer role and investment in consumer training may strengthen these processes.
Keyword Multimorbidity
Comorbidity
Primary care
Patient preference
Consumer participation
Clinical practice guidelines
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ)
Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 12 Nov 2015, 15:31:14 EST by Miss Charlotte Young on behalf of School of Public Health