The ‘quit’ smoker and stillbirth risk: a review of contemporary literature in the light of findings from a case–control study

Warland, Jane and McCutcheon, Helen (2011) The ‘quit’ smoker and stillbirth risk: a review of contemporary literature in the light of findings from a case–control study. Midwifery, 27 5: 607-611. doi:10.1016/j.midw.2010.05.007


Author Warland, Jane
McCutcheon, Helen
Title The ‘quit’ smoker and stillbirth risk: a review of contemporary literature in the light of findings from a case–control study
Journal name Midwifery   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0266-6138
1532-3099
Publication date 2011-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2010.05.007
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 27
Issue 5
Start page 607
End page 611
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: to identify existing literature which addresses the topic of detecting, assessing and intervening when a pregnant woman who has quit smoking relapses. This literature review was conducted in the light of findings of a case–control study which suggest that a quit smoking status is associated with increased risk of late stillbirth (odds ratio 3.03, 95% confidence interval 1.27–7.24, p=0.01).

Method: a structured review was conducted to identify literature related to quitting smoking in early pregnancy, prevalence and likelihood of relapse, possible methods for detecting smoking resumption, potential intervention strategies for the relapsed smoker and the societal burden of continuing to smoke in pregnancy.

Findings: there is a wide variety of evidence for the effectiveness of intervention strategies aimed at assisting women to quit smoking during pregnancy. However, few studies have specifically aimed to identify strategies to assist those women who report quitting in early pregnancy to maintain that status throughout pregnancy.

Conclusions: in light of the results of the case–control study and this literature review, it is important that changes are made to prenatal care in order to enable midwives to better identify women who are struggling with abstinence or who resume smoking during pregnancy.

Implications for practice: midwives should discuss and monitor smoking status with women at every prenatal visit. If a midwife finds that a woman has relapsed into smoking, they can be offered a range of quit smoking intervention strategies, including referral to a dedicated cessation service, counselling support, alternative therapies and, perhaps, nicotine replacement therapy. Further research aimed at identifying the extent of relapse among these women and the impact this may have on pregnancy outcome is warranted. Research to ascertain the most appropriate interventions to prevent relapse is also needed.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 11 Nov 2015, 13:58:58 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work