Intercultural Couple Communication: What We Used to Believe about Intimate Chinese Communication and What We Know Now

Lee, Sherwynna (). Intercultural Couple Communication: What We Used to Believe about Intimate Chinese Communication and What We Know Now Professional Doctorate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Lee, Sherwynna
Thesis Title Intercultural Couple Communication: What We Used to Believe about Intimate Chinese Communication and What We Know Now
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Supervisor Kim Halford
Total pages 90
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary This study explored the association between couple communication and relationship satisfaction, and potential moderating effects of culture among Chinese, Western, and intercultural Chinese-Western couples. Couple communication was coded with a newly developed coding manual to capture indirect, subtle and implicit communication behaviours, referred to as high-context communication. Overall, there was a low rate of high-context communication behaviours among all groups, suggesting that high-context communication styles is uncommon among both Western and Chinese people in Australia in intimate relationships. The highest occurring behaviour was Mutual Off-Topic, which refers to periods of active disengagement from the problem discussion, by the Chinese-Chinese couples. Contrary to predictions, disengagement from problem discussion was associated with lower relationship satisfaction among Chinese males. The results propose that the traditional and stereotypical view of Chinese and their communication behaviours may not be appropriate in the context of intimate relationships in Australia, and highlights the importance for future research in this area in majority Chinese populations. Furthermore, the results suggest that communication skill-based couples interventions developed in Western populations might be generalisable to Chinese-Western intercultural and Chinese couples living in Australia.
Keyword Couples
Communication
Intercultural
Observational
Chinese

 
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Created: Fri, 06 Nov 2015, 19:07:30 EST by Sherwynna Lee on behalf of Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences