Regional variations in percutaneous absorption of methimazole: An in vitro study on cat skin

Hill, K.E., Chambers, J.P., Jones, B.R., Bolwell, C.F., Aberdein, D. and Mills, P.C. (2015) Regional variations in percutaneous absorption of methimazole: An in vitro study on cat skin. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 38 6: 616-618. doi:10.1111/jvp.12220


Author Hill, K.E.
Chambers, J.P.
Jones, B.R.
Bolwell, C.F.
Aberdein, D.
Mills, P.C.
Title Regional variations in percutaneous absorption of methimazole: An in vitro study on cat skin
Journal name Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1365-2885
0140-7783
Publication date 2015-12-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jvp.12220
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 38
Issue 6
Start page 616
End page 618
Total pages 3
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The use of transdermal gel medications in cats has become popular in veterinary medicine due to the ease of administration compared to oral medication. The research to support systemic absorption of drugs after transdermal gel administration and the preferred skin region to apply these drugs in cats is limited. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of different skin regions on the percutaneous absorption pharmacokinetics of a commercially available transdermal methimazole after a finite dose was applied to feline skin in vitro. A commercial formulation of methimazole (10 mg) was applied to four skin regions (the inner stratum corneum of the ear, groin, neck, and thorax regions) from six cats. The receptor medium was sampled up to 36 h postapplication, and methimazole concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Methimazole was absorbed more completely across the pinnal skin, compared to the groin, neck, and thorax (P < 0.001), which justifies application to the pinna to maximize efficacy and also to minimize the effects of grooming.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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