The genome of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris B100 and its use for the reconstruction of metabolic pathways involved in xanthan biosynthesis

Vorhoelter, Frank-Joerg, Schneiker, Susanne, Goesmann, Alexander, Krause, Lutz, Bekel, Thomas, Kaiser, Olaf, Linke, Burkhar, Patschkowski, Thomas, Rueckert, Christian, Schmid, Joachim, Sidhu, Vishaldeep Kaur, Sieber, Volker, Tauch, Andreas, Watt, Steven Alexander, Weisshaar, Bemd, Becker, Anke, Niehaus, Karsten and Puehler, Alfred (2008) The genome of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris B100 and its use for the reconstruction of metabolic pathways involved in xanthan biosynthesis. Journal of Biotechnology, 134 1-2: 33-45. doi:10.1016/j.jbiotec.2007.12.013


Author Vorhoelter, Frank-Joerg
Schneiker, Susanne
Goesmann, Alexander
Krause, Lutz
Bekel, Thomas
Kaiser, Olaf
Linke, Burkhar
Patschkowski, Thomas
Rueckert, Christian
Schmid, Joachim
Sidhu, Vishaldeep Kaur
Sieber, Volker
Tauch, Andreas
Watt, Steven Alexander
Weisshaar, Bemd
Becker, Anke
Niehaus, Karsten
Puehler, Alfred
Title The genome of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris B100 and its use for the reconstruction of metabolic pathways involved in xanthan biosynthesis
Journal name Journal of Biotechnology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-1656
1873-4863
Publication date 2008-03-20
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jbiotec.2007.12.013
Volume 134
Issue 1-2
Start page 33
End page 45
Total pages 13
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract The complete genome sequence of the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris strain B100 was established. It consisted of a chromosome of 5,079,003 bp, with 4471 protein-coding genes and 62 RNA genes. Comparative genomics showed that the genes required for the synthesis of xanthan and xanthan precursors were highly conserved among three sequenced X. campestris pv. campestris genomes, but differed noticeably when compared to the remaining four Xanthomonas genomes available. For the xanthan biosynthesis genes gumB and gumK earlier translational starts were proposed, while gumI and gumL turned out to be unique with no homologues beyond the Xanthomonas genomes sequenced. From the genomic data the biosynthesis pathways for the production of the exopolysaccharide xanthan could be elucidated. The first step of this process is the uptake of sugars serving as carbon and energy sources wherefore genes for 15 carbohydrate import systems could be identified. Metabolic pathways playing a role for xanthan biosynthesis could be deduced from the annotated genome. These reconstructed pathways concerned the storage and metabolization of the imported sugars. The recognized sugar utilization pathways included the Entner-Doudoroff and the pentose phosphate pathway as well as the Embden-Meyerhof pathway (glycolysis). The reconstruction indicated that the nucleotide sugar precursors for xanthan can be converted from intermediates of the pentose phosphate pathway, some of which are also intermediates of glycolysis or the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Xanthan biosynthesis requires in particular the nucleotide sugars UDP-glucose, UDP-glucuronate, and GDP-mannose, from which xanthan repeat units are built under the control of the gum genes. The updated genome annotation data allowed reconsidering and refining the mechanistic model for xanthan biosynthesis.
Keyword Carbohydrate metabolism
Carbohydrate uptake
Comparative genomics
Nucleotide sugars synthesis genes
X. campestris pv. campestris genome sequence
Xanthan biosynthesis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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