Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential

White, Richard Allen, III, Power, Ian M., Dipple, Gregory M., Southam, Gordon and Suttle, Curtis A. (2015) Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential. Frontiers in Microbiology, 6 966: 1-14. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2015.00966


Author White, Richard Allen, III
Power, Ian M.
Dipple, Gregory M.
Southam, Gordon
Suttle, Curtis A.
Title Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential
Journal name Frontiers in Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1664-302X
Publication date 2015-09-23
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2015.00966
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Issue 966
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant in the microbialites and sediments, respectively. The microbialites were also home to many other groups associated with microbialite formation including filamentous cyanobacteria and dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, consistent with the idea of a shared global microbialite microbiome. Other members were present that are typically not associated with microbialites including Gemmatimonadetes and iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, which participate in carbon metabolism and iron cycling. Compared to the sediments, the microbialite microbiome has significantly more genes associated with photosynthetic processes (e.g., photosystem II reaction centers, carotenoid, and chlorophyll biosynthesis) and carbon fixation (e.g., CO dehydrogenase). The Clinton Creek microbialite communities had strikingly similar functional potentials to non-lithifying microbial mats from the Canadian High Arctic and Antarctica, but are functionally distinct, from non-lithifying mats or biofilms from Yellowstone. Clinton Creek microbialites also share metabolic genes (R2 < 0.750) with freshwater microbial mats from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico, but are more similar to polar Arctic mats (R2 > 0.900). These metagenomic profiles from an anthropogenic microbialite-forming ecosystem provide context to microbialite formation on a human-relevant timescale.
Keyword Microbialites
Non-lithifying microbial mats
Metagenomic assembly
Carbon sequestration
Gemmatimonadetes
Cyanobacteria
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Earth Sciences Papers
Official 2016 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 25 Oct 2015, 00:22:50 EST by System User on behalf of School of Earth Sciences