Larval dispersal and movement patterns of coral reef fishes, and implications for marine reserve network design

Green, Alison L., Maypa, Aileen P., Almany, Glenn R., Rhodes, Kevin L., Weeks, Rebecca, Abesamis, Rene A., Gleason, Mary G., Mumby, Peter J. and White, Alan T. (2015) Larval dispersal and movement patterns of coral reef fishes, and implications for marine reserve network design. Biological Reviews, 90 4: 1215-1247. doi:10.1111/brv.12155

Author Green, Alison L.
Maypa, Aileen P.
Almany, Glenn R.
Rhodes, Kevin L.
Weeks, Rebecca
Abesamis, Rene A.
Gleason, Mary G.
Mumby, Peter J.
White, Alan T.
Title Larval dispersal and movement patterns of coral reef fishes, and implications for marine reserve network design
Journal name Biological Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-185X
Publication date 2015-11-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/brv.12155
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 90
Issue 4
Start page 1215
End page 1247
Total pages 33
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Well-designed and effectively managed networks of marine reserves can be effective tools for both fisheries management and biodiversity conservation. Connectivity, the demographic linking of local populations through the dispersal of individuals as larvae, juveniles or adults, is a key ecological factor to consider in marine reserve design, since it has important implications for the persistence of metapopulations and their recovery from disturbance. For marine reserves to protect biodiversity and enhance populations of species in fished areas, they must be able to sustain focal species (particularly fishery species) within their boundaries, and be spaced such that they can function as mutually replenishing networks whilst providing recruitment subsidies to fished areas. Thus the configuration (size, spacing and location) of individual reserves within a network should be informed by larval dispersal and movement patterns of the species for which protection is required. In the past, empirical data regarding larval dispersal and movement patterns of adults and juveniles of many tropical marine species have been unavailable or inaccessible to practitioners responsible for marine reserve design. Recent empirical studies using new technologies have also provided fresh insights into movement patterns of many species and redefined our understanding of connectivity among populations through larval dispersal. Our review of movement patterns of 34 families (210 species) of coral reef fishes demonstrates that movement patterns (home ranges, ontogenetic shifts and spawning migrations) vary among and within species, and are influenced by a range of factors (e.g. size, sex, behaviour, density, habitat characteristics, season, tide and time of day). Some species move <0.1–0.5 km (e.g. damselfishes, butterflyfishes and angelfishes), <0.5–3 km (e.g. most parrotfishes, goatfishes and surgeonfishes) or 3–10 km (e.g. large parrotfishes and wrasses), while others move tens to hundreds (e.g. some groupers, emperors, snappers and jacks) or thousands of kilometres (e.g. some sharks and tuna). Larval dispersal distances tend to be <5–15 km, and self-recruitment is common. Synthesising this information allows us, for the first time, to provide species, specific advice on the size, spacing and location of marine reserves in tropical marine ecosystems to maximise benefits for conservation and fisheries management for a range of taxa. We recommend that: (i) marine reserves should be more than twice the size of the home range of focal species (in all directions), thus marine reserves of various sizes will be required depending on which species require protection, how far they move, and if other effective protection is in place outside reserves; (ii) reserve spacing should be <15 km, with smaller reserves spaced more closely; and (iii) marine reserves should include habitats that are critical to the life history of focal species (e.g. home ranges, nursery grounds, migration corridors and spawning aggregations), and be located to accommodate movement patterns among these. We also provide practical advice for practitioners on how to use this information to design, evaluate and monitor the effectiveness of marine reserve networks within broader ecological, socioeconomic and management contexts.
Keyword Connectivity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 16 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 15 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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