An investigation of the role of parental request for self-correction of stuttering in the Lidcombe Program

Donaghy, Michelle, Harrison, Elisabeth, O'Brian, Sue, Menzies, Ross, Onslow, Mark, Packman, Ann and Jones, Mark (2015) An investigation of the role of parental request for self-correction of stuttering in the Lidcombe Program. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 17 5: 511-517. doi:10.3109/17549507.2015.1016110


Author Donaghy, Michelle
Harrison, Elisabeth
O'Brian, Sue
Menzies, Ross
Onslow, Mark
Packman, Ann
Jones, Mark
Title An investigation of the role of parental request for self-correction of stuttering in the Lidcombe Program
Journal name International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1754-9507
1754-9515
Publication date 2015-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/17549507.2015.1016110
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 17
Issue 5
Start page 511
End page 517
Total pages 7
Place of publication Abingdon, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: The Lidcombe Program is a behavioural treatment for stuttering in children younger than 6 years that is supported by evidence of efficacy and effectiveness. The treatment incorporates parent verbal contingencies for stutter-free speech and for stuttering. However, the contribution of those contingencies to reductions in stuttering in the program is unclear.

Method: Thirty-four parent–child dyads were randomized to two treatment groups. The control group received standard Lidcombe Program and the experimental group received Lidcombe Program without instruction to parents to use the verbal contingency request for self-correction. Treatment responsiveness was measured as time to 50% stuttering severity reduction.

Result: No differences were found between groups on primary outcome measures of the number of weeks and clinic visits to 50% reduction in stuttering severity.

Conclusion: This clinical experiment challenges the assumption that the verbal contingency request for self-correction contributes to treatment efficacy. Results suggest the need for further research to explore this issue.
Keyword Stuttering
Lidcombe program
verbal contingencies
Randomized controlled-trial
Predicting treatment time
Intervention
Child
Language
Impact
Metaanalysis
Replication
Delivery
Speech
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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