Experimental hookworm infection and escalating gluten challenges are associated with increased microbial richness in celiac subjects

Giacomin, Paul, Zakrzewski, Martha, Croese, John, Su, Xiaopei, Sotillo, Javier, McCann, Leisa, Navarro, Severine, Mitreva, Makedonka, Krause, Lutz, Loukas, Alex and Cantacessi, Cinzia (2015) Experimental hookworm infection and escalating gluten challenges are associated with increased microbial richness in celiac subjects. Scientific Reports, 5 Art No.: 13797: . doi:10.1038/srep13797


Author Giacomin, Paul
Zakrzewski, Martha
Croese, John
Su, Xiaopei
Sotillo, Javier
McCann, Leisa
Navarro, Severine
Mitreva, Makedonka
Krause, Lutz
Loukas, Alex
Cantacessi, Cinzia
Title Experimental hookworm infection and escalating gluten challenges are associated with increased microbial richness in celiac subjects
Journal name Scientific Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2045-2322
Publication date 2015-09-18
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/srep13797
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Issue Art No.: 13797
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The intestinal microbiota plays a critical role in the development of the immune system. Recent investigations have highlighted the potential of helminth therapy for treating a range of inflammatory disorders, including celiac disease (CeD); however, the mechanisms by which helminths modulate the immune response of the human host and ameliorate CeD pathology are unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential role of alterations in the human gut microbiota in helminth-mediated suppression of an inflammatory disease. We assessed the qualitative and quantitative changes in the microbiota of human volunteers with CeD prior to and following infection with human hookworms, and following challenge with escalating doses of dietary gluten. Experimental hookworm infection of the trial subjects resulted in maintenance of the composition of the intestinal flora, even after a moderate gluten challenge. Notably, we observed a significant increase in microbial species richness over the course of the trial, which could represent a potential mechanism by which hookworms can regulate gluten-induced inflammation and maintain intestinal immune homeostasis.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
UQ Diamantina Institute Publications
 
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