Korean-Canadian immigrants’ help-seeking and self-management of suicidal behaviours

Han, Christina S. and Oliffe, John L. (2015) Korean-Canadian immigrants’ help-seeking and self-management of suicidal behaviours. Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health, 34 1: 17-30. doi:10.7870/cjcmh-2014-036

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Author Han, Christina S.
Oliffe, John L.
Title Korean-Canadian immigrants’ help-seeking and self-management of suicidal behaviours
Journal name Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0713-3936
1929-7084
Publication date 2015-04
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.7870/cjcmh-2014-036
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 34
Issue 1
Start page 17
End page 30
Total pages 24
Place of publication Vancouver, BC Canada
Publisher Canadian Periodical for Community Studies
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Suicidal behaviours are intricately connected to culture, oftentimes reflecting traditional norms and attitudes to health help-seeking and self-management. To describe Korean-Canadian immigrants’ help-seeking and self-management for their suicidal behaviours, 15 participants completed individual semistructured indepth interviews. Using constant comparison analysis, participants’ narratives were analysed to inductively derive two themes: 1) resisting professional help; and, 2) developing effective self-management strategies. The study findings suggest that most participants preferred and opted for self-management strategies rather than seeking professional help. Most participants’ reluctance to seek professional or peer help was underpinned by a fear of the stigma associated with traversing cultural norms by harbouring a mental illness and seeking help for that ailment. In addition, a lack of knowledge about available professional health care services, along with language and cultural barriers, led some participants to perceive mental health services as ineffectual. Participants’ determination to self-manage their suicidality was influenced by cultural norms around honouring and protecting family, and a range of spiritual and religious beliefs also emerged to counter impulses for acting on suicidal thoughts. By shedding light on Korean-Canadian immigrants’ experiences with suicidal behaviours, the findings offer some guidance toward developing culture-sensitive suicide prevention programs.
Keyword Suicide
Korean Canadians
Immigrants
Help seeking
Mental health stigma
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 02 Oct 2015, 11:00:51 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work