Student identification of the need for complementary medicine education in Australian medical curricula: a constructivist grounded theory approach

Templeman, Kate, Robinson, Anske and McKenna, Lisa (2015) Student identification of the need for complementary medicine education in Australian medical curricula: a constructivist grounded theory approach. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 23 2: 257-264. doi:10.1016/j.ctim.2015.02.002


Author Templeman, Kate
Robinson, Anske
McKenna, Lisa
Title Student identification of the need for complementary medicine education in Australian medical curricula: a constructivist grounded theory approach
Journal name Complementary Therapies in Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0965-2299
1873-6963
Publication date 2015-04
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.02.002
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 23
Issue 2
Start page 257
End page 264
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective

Across the Western world, including Australia, growing popularity of complementary medicines (CMs) mandates their implementation into medical education (ME). Medical students in international contexts have expressed a need to learn about CMs. In Australia, little is known about the student-specific need for CM education. The objective of this paper was to assess the self-reported need for CM education among Australian medical students.

Design

Thirty second-year to final-year medical students participated in semi-structured interviews. A constructivist grounded theory methodological approach was used to generate, construct and analyse data.

Setting

Medical school education faculties in Australian universities.

Results

Medical students generally held favourable attitudes toward CMs but had knowledge deficits and did not feel adept at counselling patients about CMs. All students were supportive of CM education in ME, noting its importance in relation to the doctor–patient encounter, specifically with regard to interactions with medical management. As future practitioners, students recognised the need to be able to effectively communicate about CMs and advise patients regarding safe and effective CM use.

Conclusions

Australian medical students expressed interest in, and the need for, CM education in ME regardless of their opinion of it, and were supportive of evidence-based CMs being part of their armamentarium. However, current levels of CM education in medical schools do not adequately enable this. This level of receptivity suggests the need for CM education with firm recommendations and competencies to assist CM education development required. Identifying this need may help medical educators to respond more effectively.
Keyword Medical education
Medical curriculum
Complementary medicine
Alternative medicine
Qualitative methodology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 01 Oct 2015, 11:49:40 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work