Population structure and genetic diversity of invasive Phyla canescens: implications for the evolutionary potential

Xu, Cheng-Yuan, Tang, Shaoqing, Fatemi, Mohammad, Gross, Caroline L., Julien, Mic H., Curtis, Caitlin and van Klinken, Rieks D. (2015) Population structure and genetic diversity of invasive Phyla canescens: implications for the evolutionary potential. Ecosphere, 6 9: 162.1-162.21. doi:10.1890/ES14-00374.1


Author Xu, Cheng-Yuan
Tang, Shaoqing
Fatemi, Mohammad
Gross, Caroline L.
Julien, Mic H.
Curtis, Caitlin
van Klinken, Rieks D.
Title Population structure and genetic diversity of invasive Phyla canescens: implications for the evolutionary potential
Formatted title
Population structure and genetic diversity of invasive Phyla canescens: implications for the evolutionary potential
Journal name Ecosphere   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2150-8925
Publication date 2015-09-29
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1890/ES14-00374.1
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Issue 9
Start page 162.1
End page 162.21
Total pages 21
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher Ecological Society of America
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Population bottlenecks during founder events tend to constrict the genetic diversity in introduced populations, thereby limiting their evolutionary potential and subsequent ability to adapt to their new environment. Paradoxically, rapid evolutionary changes have been recently found to be widespread in invasive species and have been proposed as a precursor to successful invasions. Information about population structure, introduction history and genetic diversity is essential for addressing this paradox and testing evolutionary hypotheses for any specific invasive species. In this study, we used microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic properties that may underpin the evolutionary potential of the invasive herb Phyla canescens, for which rapid, selection-driven evolution has already been demonstrated. Population structure and genetic diversity were compared between the native (South America) and two introduced ranges (eastern Australia and southern France). South American populations included all the 64 alleles found in the study and most individuals belonged to two distinct genetic clusters originating from northwest Argentina and central Argentina respectively. Invasive populations in eastern Australia and southern France were most closely linked to the central Argentine cluster. Microsatellite results also showed both a reduced genetic diversity at the population level, and the occurrence of a significant genetic bottleneck in many introduced populations. Our results suggest that P. canescens can undergo rapid, selection-driven evolution despite significant population bottlenecks and reductions in diversity. The question about the ‘genetic paradox' for P. canescens therefore is how much genetic diversity is enough to underpin rapid evolution, or whether it is the type of diversity rather than the amount that is important.
Keyword Biogeography
Biological control
Microsatellite
Population bottleneck
Rapid Evolution
Structure software
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 30 Sep 2015, 20:39:00 EST by Caitlin Curtis on behalf of School of Biological Sciences