Ethnic Identity in Emerging Adults in Sub-Saharan Africa and the USA, and Its Associations with Psychological Well-Being

Adams, Byron G., Abubakar, Amina, Van de Vijver, F.J.R., De Bruin, Gideon P., Arasa, Josephine, Fomba, Emmanuel, Gillath, Omri, Hapunda, Given, Looh La, Joseph, Mazrui, Lubna and Murugami, Margaret (2015) Ethnic Identity in Emerging Adults in Sub-Saharan Africa and the USA, and Its Associations with Psychological Well-Being. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 26 3: 236-252. doi:10.1002/casp.2247


Author Adams, Byron G.
Abubakar, Amina
Van de Vijver, F.J.R.
De Bruin, Gideon P.
Arasa, Josephine
Fomba, Emmanuel
Gillath, Omri
Hapunda, Given
Looh La, Joseph
Mazrui, Lubna
Murugami, Margaret
Title Ethnic Identity in Emerging Adults in Sub-Saharan Africa and the USA, and Its Associations with Psychological Well-Being
Journal name Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1099-1298
1052-9284
Publication date 2015-09-17
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/casp.2247
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 26
Issue 3
Start page 236
End page 252
Total pages 17
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Ethnic identity as a social dimension of identity is argued to be developmentally important for psychological well-being. However, the relationships between these constructs are mainly examined in Western contexts, amongst dominant–non-dominant groups. We investigate ethnic identity across the mainstream group of a prototypical Western society (the USA) and several multi-ethnic sub-Saharan African countries (Cameroon, Kenya, South Africa, and Zambia), as well as how it relates to psychological well-being. A total of 1255 university students (61.8% females, Mage = 20.94 years, SD = 2.97) completed a questionnaire with ethnic identity and psychological well-being measures. Results indicated that ethnic identity was most salient in two different South African ethnocultural samples and least salient in a mainstream US sample. These results suggest that groups that are more exposed to ethnic strain in multicultural societies tend to have more salient ethnic identities. Furthermore, the underlying structure in the ethnic identity psychological well-being relationship was similar across groups.
Keyword Emerging adults
Ethnic identity
Psychological well-being
Sub-Saharan Africa
USA
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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