Characterization of Fiber-Forming Peptides and Proteins by Means of Atomic Force Microscopy

Creasey, Rhiannon G., Gibson, Christopher T. and Voelcker, Nicolas H. (2012) Characterization of Fiber-Forming Peptides and Proteins by Means of Atomic Force Microscopy. Current Protein and Peptide Science, 13 3: 232-257.

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Author Creasey, Rhiannon G.
Gibson, Christopher T.
Voelcker, Nicolas H.
Title Characterization of Fiber-Forming Peptides and Proteins by Means of Atomic Force Microscopy
Journal name Current Protein and Peptide Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1389-2037
1875-5550
Publication date 2012-05
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 13
Issue 3
Start page 232
End page 257
Total pages 26
Place of publication Bussum, The Netherlands
Publisher Bentham Science Publishers
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in biological sciences due to its ability to perform imaging experiments at high resolution in a physiological environment, without special sample preparation such as fixation or staining. AFM is unique, in that it allows single molecule information of mechanical properties and molecular recognition to be gathered. This review sets out to identify methodological applications of AFM for characterization of fiber-forming proteins and peptides. The basics of AFM operation are detailed, with in-depth information for any life scientist to get a grasp on AFM capabilities. It also briefly describes antibody recognition imaging and mapping of nanomechanical properties on biological samples. Subsequently, examples of AFM application to fiber-forming natural proteins, and fiberforming synthetic peptides are given. Here, AFM is used primarily for structural characterization of fibers in combination with other techniques, such as circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. More recent developments in antibody recognition imaging to identify constituents of protein fibers formed in human disease are explored. This review, as a whole, seeks to encourage the life scientists dealing with protein aggregation phenomena to consider AFM as a part of their research toolkit, by highlighting the manifold capabilities of this technique.
Keyword Atomic force microscopy
Antibody recognition imaging
Protein Aggregation
Peptide fibers
Alpha Synuclein Oligomers
Vascular endothelial cells
Molecular Adhesion Bonds
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: School of Chemical Engineering Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 15 Sep 2015, 10:24:36 EST by Noni Creasey on behalf of School of Chemical Engineering