When "in your face" is not out of place: the effect of timing of disclosure of a same-sex dating partner under conditions of contact

Dane, Sharon K., Masser, Barbara M., MacDonald, Geoff and Duck, Julie M. (2015) When "in your face" is not out of place: the effect of timing of disclosure of a same-sex dating partner under conditions of contact. PLoS One, 10 8: 1-29. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0135023


Author Dane, Sharon K.
Masser, Barbara M.
MacDonald, Geoff
Duck, Julie M.
Title When "in your face" is not out of place: the effect of timing of disclosure of a same-sex dating partner under conditions of contact
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2015-08-26
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0135023
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 10
Issue 8
Start page 1
End page 29
Total pages 29
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract In a series of experiments we examined heterosexuals’ reactions to the timing of disclosure of a gender-matched confederate’s same-sex dating partner. Disclosure occurred in a naturalistic context–that is, it occurred when meeting, or expecting to soon meet, a same-sex attracted individual, who voluntarily shared this information with the participant as a natural part of a broader topic of discussion. The confederate, when disclosing early rather than later, was approached more closely (Prestudy) and liked more (Studies 1–2). Those experiencing early disclosure, compared with later, were less drawn to topics of lower intimacy (Study 1), were happier and more excited about meeting the confederate, and more likely to choose to be alone with the confederate for a one-on-one discussion (Study 2). Further, women experiencing early disclosure were more willing to introduce the same-gender confederate to their friends (Study 2). The benefits of knowing sooner, rather than later, continued to apply even when participants were given further time to process the disclosure. To explore the underlying reasons for the more favorable experiences of upfront disclosure, we examined participants’ memory of the information shared by the confederate (Study 3). Results revealed that those who experienced delayed disclosure were more likely to incorrectly recall and negatively embellish information related to the confederate’s sexual orientation, suggesting that early disclosure resulted in a reduced tendency to focus on the confederate’s sexuality as a defining feature. These positive findings for early timing are discussed in light of previous studies that have found benefits for delayed disclosure and those that have failed to investigate the effects of timing of ‘coming out’ under conditions of contact.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 13 Sep 2015, 00:23:27 EST by System User on behalf of School of Psychology