Experiences and employment intentions among aged care nurses and nursing assistants from diverse cultural backgrounds: A qualitative interview study

Gao, Fengsong, Tilse, Cheryl, Wilson, Jill, Tuckett, Anthony and Newcombe, Peter (2015) Experiences and employment intentions among aged care nurses and nursing assistants from diverse cultural backgrounds: A qualitative interview study. Journal of Aging Studies, 35 111-122. doi:10.1016/j.jaging.2015.08.006


Author Gao, Fengsong
Tilse, Cheryl
Wilson, Jill
Tuckett, Anthony
Newcombe, Peter
Title Experiences and employment intentions among aged care nurses and nursing assistants from diverse cultural backgrounds: A qualitative interview study
Journal name Journal of Aging Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0890-4065
1879-193X
Publication date 2015-09-11
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jaging.2015.08.006
Volume 35
Start page 111
End page 122
Total pages 12
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The residential aged care industry faces shortages and high turnover rates of direct care workers. This situation is further complicated by the increasing cultural diversity of residents and staff. To retain direct care workers, it is crucial to explore their perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of care work, and their employment intentions in multicultural environments. A qualitative descriptive study was used to understand perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of residential aged care work for core direct care workers (i.e. nurses and nursing assistants), how these were related to their intentions to stay or leave, and how these varied between nurses and nursing assistants, and between locally and overseas born workers. Individual interviews were conducted between June and September 2013 with 16 direct care workers in an Australian residential aged care facility with a specific focus on people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. It was found that direct care workers’ employment intentions were related to their perceptions and management of the rewards and difficulties of care work. Their experiences of care work, the employment characteristics, and the organizational resources that fitted their personality, ability, expectations, and essential needs were viewed as rewards. Evaluating their jobs as meaningful was a shared perception for direct care workers who intended to stay. Individual workers' perceptions of the rewarding aspects of care work served to counterbalance the challenges of care work, and promoted their intentions to stay. Perceptions and employment intentions varied by occupational groups and by cultural backgrounds. Overseas born direct care workers are valuable resources in residential aged care facility rather than a limitation, but they do require organizational support, such as cultural awareness of the management, English language support, a sense of family, and appropriate job responsibility. The findings indicated that aged care policy makers and service providers should understand the range of individual direct care workers’ positive and negative perceptions, and their employment intentions within the context of their roles and their cultural backgrounds.
Keyword Longterm care workforce
Employment intention
Nurse
Nursing assistant
Cultural diversity
Qualitative study
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 12 Sep 2015, 11:37:40 EST by Dr Anthony Tuckett on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work