Two pathways through adversity: predicting well‐being and housing outcomes among homeless service users

Walter, Zoe C., Jetten, Jolanda, Dingle, Genevieve, Parsell, Cameron and Johnstone, Melissa (2015) Two pathways through adversity: predicting well‐being and housing outcomes among homeless service users. British Journal of Social Psychology, 55 2: 357-374. doi:10.1111/bjso.12127


Author Walter, Zoe C.
Jetten, Jolanda
Dingle, Genevieve
Parsell, Cameron
Johnstone, Melissa
Title Two pathways through adversity: predicting well‐being and housing outcomes among homeless service users
Journal name British Journal of Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0144-6665
2044-8309
Publication date 2015-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/bjso.12127
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 55
Issue 2
Start page 357
End page 374
Total pages 18
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley and Sons
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
People who experience homelessness face many challenges and disadvantages that negatively impact health and well-being and form barriers to achieving stable housing. Further, people who are homeless often have limited social connections and support. Building on previous research that has shown the beneficial effect of group identification on health and well-being, the current study explores the relationship between two social identity processes – multiple group memberships and service identification – and well-being and positive housing outcomes. Measures were collected from 76 participants while they were residing in a homeless accommodation service (T1) and again 2–4 weeks after leaving the service (or 3 months after T1 if participants had not left the service). Mediation analyses revealed that multiple group memberships and service identification at T1 independently predicted well-being at T2 indirectly, via social support. Further, both social identity processes also indirectly predicted housing outcomes via social support. The implications of these findings are twofold. First, while belonging to multiple social groups may provide a pathway to gaining social support and well-being, group belonging may not necessarily be beneficial to achieve stable housing. Second, fostering identification with homeless services may be particularly important as a source of support that contributes to well-being.
Keyword Well being
Homelessness
Social Support
Multiple group memberships
Social identity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 11 Sep 2015, 09:54:46 EST by Dr Cameron Parsell on behalf of Institute for Social Science Research