Depositional variability of estuarine intertidal sediments and implications for metal distribution: an example from Moreton Bay (Australia)

Morelli, Guia and Gasparon, Massimo (2015) Depositional variability of estuarine intertidal sediments and implications for metal distribution: an example from Moreton Bay (Australia). Continental Shelf Research, 108 41-54. doi:10.1016/j.csr.2015.07.017

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Morelli, Guia
Gasparon, Massimo
Title Depositional variability of estuarine intertidal sediments and implications for metal distribution: an example from Moreton Bay (Australia)
Journal name Continental Shelf Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-6955
0278-4343
Publication date 2015-07-29
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.csr.2015.07.017
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 108
Start page 41
End page 54
Total pages 26
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study examines the patterns of depositional variability, sediment geochemistry and metal distribution in intertidal areas of Moreton Bay, southeast Queensland, Australia. Recent concern over increasing human impact on the bay has generated the need to obtain evidence on how the disturbance of the depositional setting might affect the natural estuarine environment.

Sediment stratigraphy, major, and trace element analyses of sediment cores show that the sedimentation pattern is unique to each intertidal site. Disturbed 210Pb and 137Cs activity profiles of some of the cores indicate that sediment reworking occurs across the intertidal flats up to a depth of at least 80 cm. With some notable exceptions, an accurate geochronology of the surface sediments could not be established due to low 210Pb activities and sediment mixing. Thus, an increase in Pb, Zn and Cu towards the surface sediments observed at various sites is attributed to both anthropogenic contribution following the rapid urban development in the last century and to post-depositional diagenetic processes, bioturbation and sediment re-suspension induced by tides, storms or floods. Sediment cores are representative only of the local sedimentation and may not always allow extensive correlation to larger areas. Vertical profiles of heavy metals reflect the different depositional environment controlled by the complex hydrodynamics of the bay. Local hydrologic, physical, and tidal conditions might induce metals redistribution at different scales. This information is of critical importance in view of sediment remobilization caused by future development such as dredging, intertidal areas reclamation or excavation of new navigational channels.
Keyword 210Pb
Estuaries
Metals
Moreton Bay
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Earth Sciences Papers
Official 2016 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 08 Sep 2015, 00:29:37 EST by System User on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service