Metropolitan land-use patterns by economic function: a spatial analysis of firm headquarters and branch office locations in Australian cities

Sigler, Thomas, Searle, Glen, Martinus, Kirsten and Tonts, Matthew (2015) Metropolitan land-use patterns by economic function: a spatial analysis of firm headquarters and branch office locations in Australian cities. Urban Geography, 37 3: 416-435. doi:10.1080/02723638.2015.1075318


Author Sigler, Thomas
Searle, Glen
Martinus, Kirsten
Tonts, Matthew
Title Metropolitan land-use patterns by economic function: a spatial analysis of firm headquarters and branch office locations in Australian cities
Journal name Urban Geography   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0272-3638
1938-2847
Publication date 2015-09-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02723638.2015.1075318
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 37
Issue 3
Start page 416
End page 435
Total pages 7
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This paper develops a comparative means by which to understand metropolitan spatial structure through the dynamics of economic activities. Clustering and suburbanization have been key processes within the contemporary urban landscape, but few scholarly accounts have systematically merged the two to explain the geographies of economic activity. Using firm location as a variable to discern sector- and industry-based locational requirements, we explore land-use and economic activity in Australia’s five largest metropolitan areas. Drawing upon the respective headquarters and branch office locations of a set of publically traded firms, we seek to establish general spatial patterns across Australian cities using two proxy measures for clustering and suburbanization, being well-established drivers of firm locational choice. Despite the complexity that post-industrial and suburbanizing processes add to metropolitan land-use patterns, we contend that certain patterns exist that can be generalized from one context to another across urban space, and that certain emerging trends such as the development of CBD-fringe precincts merit greater attention.
Keyword Economic Geography
Clustering
Dispersal
Spatial analysis
Multinational corporations
Australia
Cities
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
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Created: Fri, 04 Sep 2015, 20:29:23 EST by Thomas Sigler on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management