The value of qualitative research in dysphagia in the head and neck cancer population: What can we learn from the survivors' perspective?

Nund, Rebecca, Ward, Elizabeth, Scarinci, Nerina and Cartmill, Bena (2015) The value of qualitative research in dysphagia in the head and neck cancer population: What can we learn from the survivors' perspective?. Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders, 24 99-106. doi:10.1044/sasd24.3.99


Author Nund, Rebecca
Ward, Elizabeth
Scarinci, Nerina
Cartmill, Bena
Title The value of qualitative research in dysphagia in the head and neck cancer population: What can we learn from the survivors' perspective?
Journal name Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders
ISSN 1940-7556
1940-7564
Publication date 2015-06-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1044/sasd24.3.99
Volume 24
Start page 99
End page 106
Total pages 8
Place of publication Rockville, MD United States
Publisher American Speech - Language - Hearing Association
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Dysphagia is a common acute and long-term side effect of curative, non-surgical treatment for head and neck cancer (HNC). Despite what is known about dysphagia associated with HNC treatment in terms of its prevalence, severity, physiological characteristics, and the associated effects on quality of life (QoL), our understanding of the key factors which impact on HNC survivors is only just emerging. Whilst quantitative research studies have demonstrated that most people experience dysphagia in the early post-treatment period, and that many people continue to have ongoing swallowing issues for months and years following treatment, emerging qualitative research in this field has provided insights into the extent to which the presence of dysphagia impacts on the everyday lives of people with HNC. By exploring issues from the perspectives of people living with dysphagia, qualitative research has highlighted those factors that have the greatest impact on oral intake, raised issues for service provision, and highlighted the need for additional professional involvement and better long term supportive care.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2015, 13:16:53 EST by Rebecca Nund on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences