In vitro comparison of active and passive physiological control systems for biventricular assist devices

Pauls, Jo P., Stevens, Michael C., Schummy, Emma, Tansley, Geoff, Fraser, John F., Timms, Daniel and Gregory, Shaun D. (2015) In vitro comparison of active and passive physiological control systems for biventricular assist devices. Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 1-11. doi:10.1007/s10439-015-1425-1


Author Pauls, Jo P.
Stevens, Michael C.
Schummy, Emma
Tansley, Geoff
Fraser, John F.
Timms, Daniel
Gregory, Shaun D.
Title In vitro comparison of active and passive physiological control systems for biventricular assist devices
Formatted title
In vitro comparison of active and passive physiological control systems for biventricular assist devices
Journal name Annals of Biomedical Engineering   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1573-9686
0090-6964
Publication date 2015-08-18
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10439-015-1425-1
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer New York
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The low preload and high afterload sensitivities of rotary ventricular assist devices (VADs) may cause ventricular suction events or venous congestion. This is particularly problematic with rotary biventricular support (BiVAD), where the Starling response is diminished in both ventricles. Therefore, VADs may benefit from physiological control systems to prevent adverse events. This study compares active, passive and combined physiological controllers for rotary BiVAD support with constant speed mode. Systemic (SVR) and pulmonary (PVR) vascular resistance changes and exercise were simulated in a mock circulation loop to evaluate the capacity of each controller to prevent suction and congestion and increase exercise capacity. All controllers prevented suction and congestion at high levels of PVR (900 dynes s cm−5) and SVR (3000 dynes s cm−5), however these events occurred in constant speed mode. The controllers increased preload sensitivity (0.198–0.34 L min−1 mmHg−1) and reduced afterload sensitivity (0.0001–0.008 L min−1 mmHg−1) of the VADs when compared to constant speed mode (0.091 and 0.072 L min−1 mmHg−1 respectively). The active controller increased pump speeds (400–800 rpm) and pump flow by 2.8 L min−1 during exercise, thus increasing exercise capacity. By reducing suction and congestion and by increasing exercise capacity, the control systems presented in this study may help increase quality of life of VAD patients.
Keyword Active control
Passive control
Physiological control
Ventricular assist devices
Ventricular suction prevention
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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