In vitro fermentation of chewed mango and banana: particle size, starch and vascular fibre effects

Low, Dorrain Y., Williams, Barbara A., D'Arcy, Bruce R., Flanagan, Bernadine M. and Gidley, Michael J. (2015) In vitro fermentation of chewed mango and banana: particle size, starch and vascular fibre effects. Food and Function, 6 8: 2464-2474. doi:10.1039/c5fo00363f


Author Low, Dorrain Y.
Williams, Barbara A.
D'Arcy, Bruce R.
Flanagan, Bernadine M.
Gidley, Michael J.
Title In vitro fermentation of chewed mango and banana: particle size, starch and vascular fibre effects
Journal name Food and Function   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2042-650X
2042-6496
Publication date 2015-08-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1039/c5fo00363f
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 6
Issue 8
Start page 2464
End page 2474
Total pages 11
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Royal Society of Chemistry
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract Fruits (and vegetables) contain cellular structures that are not degraded by human digestive enzymes. Therefore, the structure of the insoluble fraction of swallowed fruits is mostly retained until intestinal microbial fermentation. In vitro fermentation of mango and banana cell structures, which survived in vivo mastication and in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, were incubated with porcine faecal inoculum and showed intensive metabolic activity. This included degradation of cell walls, leading to the release of encapsulated cell contents for further microbial metabolism. Production of cumulative gas, short chain fatty acids and ammonia were greater for mango than for banana. Microscopic and spectroscopic analyses showed this was due to a major fermentation-resistant starch fraction present in banana, that was absent in mango. This study demonstrated distinctive differences in the fermentability of banana and mango, reflecting a preferential degradation of (parenchyma) fleshy cell walls over resistant starch in banana, and the thick cellulosic vascular fibres in mango.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2016 Collection
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 25 Aug 2015, 01:34:26 EST by System User on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences