Post-exercise cold water immersion attenuates acute anabolic signalling and long-term adaptations in muscle to strength training

Roberts, Llion A., Raastad, Truls, Markworth, James F., Figueiredo, Vandre C., Egner, Ingrid M., Shield, Anthony, Cameron-Smith, David, Coombes, Jeff S. and Peake, Jonathan M. (2015) Post-exercise cold water immersion attenuates acute anabolic signalling and long-term adaptations in muscle to strength training. The Journal of Physiology, 593 18: 4285-4301. doi:10.1113/JP270570


Author Roberts, Llion A.
Raastad, Truls
Markworth, James F.
Figueiredo, Vandre C.
Egner, Ingrid M.
Shield, Anthony
Cameron-Smith, David
Coombes, Jeff S.
Peake, Jonathan M.
Title Post-exercise cold water immersion attenuates acute anabolic signalling and long-term adaptations in muscle to strength training
Journal name The Journal of Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-7793
0022-3751
Publication date 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1113/JP270570
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 593
Issue 18
Start page 4285
End page 4301
Total pages 17
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We investigated functional, morphological and molecular adaptations to strength training exercise and cold water immersion (CWI) through two separate studies. In one study, 21 physically active men strength trained for 12 weeks (2 days per week), with either 10 min of CWI or active recovery (ACT) after each training session. Strength and muscle mass increased more in the ACT group than in the CWI group (P < 0.05). Isokinetic work (19%), type II muscle fibre cross-sectional area (17%) and the number of myonuclei per fibre (26%) increased in the ACT group (all P < 0.05), but not the CWI group. In another study, nine active men performed a bout of single-leg strength exercises on separate days, followed by CWI or ACT. Muscle biopsies were collected before and 2, 24 and 48 h after exercise. The number of satellite cells expressing neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) (10−30%) and paired box protein (Pax7) (20−50%) increased 24–48 h after exercise with ACT. The number of NCAM+ satellite cells increased 48 h after exercise with CWI. NCAM+- and Pax7+-positive satellite cell numbers were greater after ACT than after CWI (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of p70S6 kinaseThr421/Ser424 increased after exercise in both conditions but was greater after ACT (P < 0.05). These data suggest that CWI attenuates the acute changes in satellite cell numbers and activity of kinases that regulate muscle hypertrophy, which may translate to smaller long-term training gains in muscle strength and hypertrophy. The use of CWI as a regular post-exercise recovery strategy should be reconsidered.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 19 Aug 2015, 10:26:54 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences