Regulatory focus and attitudes towards migrants

Whelan, Jennifer, Laham, Simon M., Peters, Kim, Boldero, Jennifer and Kashima, Yoshihisa (2010) Regulatory focus and attitudes towards migrants. International Journal of Psychology, 45 3: 190-201. doi:10.1080/00207590903511203


Author Whelan, Jennifer
Laham, Simon M.
Peters, Kim
Boldero, Jennifer
Kashima, Yoshihisa
Title Regulatory focus and attitudes towards migrants
Journal name International Journal of Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-7594
464-066X
Publication date 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/00207590903511203
Volume 45
Issue 3
Start page 190
End page 201
Total pages 12
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In two studies we examined the role of two regulatory foci (i.e., prevention and promotion) in predicting Australian's attitudes to different types of migrants. According to regulatory focus theory, promotion-focused self-regulation is concerned with nurturance and accomplishment needs and involves the pursuit of wishes and aspirations. As such, it results in sensitivity to positive outcomes and to relative pleasure from gains. On the other hand, prevention-focused self-regulation is concerned with security needs and is directed at meeting duties and obligations. As such, it results in sensitivity to negative outcome and relative pain from losses. In Study 1, as predicted, the extent of promotion focus (i.e., a concern with accomplishment and the pursuit of ideals) predicted more positive attitudes to culturally similar and economically beneficial migrants, whereas the extent of prevention focus (i.e., concern with security and meeting obligations) predicted more negative attitudes to migrants who are culturally dissimilar. In Study 2 we replicated and extended these findings, showing that the extent of promotion focus and a lack of concern with threats predicted positive attitudes to both culturally similar and economically beneficial migrants, which, in the case of the latter group, was mediated by a focus on the benefits these migrants provide. In the case of culturally dissimilar migrants, the extent of promotion focus and a concern with gains predicted more positive attitudes. However, for economically less beneficial migrants, neither the extent of promotion nor prevention focus was a predictor. Only lower concerns with threat predicted more positive attitudes to this migrant group. The results are discussed with respect to other determinants of attitudes to migrants and the implications for migration and asylum-seeker policy
Keyword Asylum seekers
Migrants
Regulatory focus
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 17 Aug 2015, 09:02:12 EST by Kim Peters on behalf of School of Psychology