Mechanisms of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 displacement of endemic strains: An epidemiological model

Yakob, Laith, Riley, Thomas V., Paterson, David L., Marquess, John, Magalhaes, Ricardo J. S., Furuya-Kanamori, Luis and Clements, Archie C. A. (2015) Mechanisms of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 displacement of endemic strains: An epidemiological model. Scientific Reports, 5 1-9. doi:10.1038/srep12666


Author Yakob, Laith
Riley, Thomas V.
Paterson, David L.
Marquess, John
Magalhaes, Ricardo J. S.
Furuya-Kanamori, Luis
Clements, Archie C. A.
Title Mechanisms of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 displacement of endemic strains: An epidemiological model
Formatted title
Mechanisms of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 displacement of endemic strains: An epidemiological model
Journal name Scientific Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2045-2322
Publication date 2015-07-28
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/srep12666
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Following rapid, global clonal dominance of hypervirulent ribotypes, Clostridium difficile now constitutes the primary infectious cause of nosocomial diarrhoea. Evidence indicates at least three possible mechanisms of hypervirulence that facilitates the successful invasion of these atypical strains: 1) increased infectiousness relative to endemic strains; 2) increased symptomatic disease rate relative to endemic strains; and 3) an ability to outcompete endemic strains in the host’s gut. Stochastic simulations of an infection transmission model demonstrate clear differences between the invasion potentials of C. difficile strains utilising the alternative hypervirulence mechanisms, and provide new evidence that favours certain mechanisms (1 and 2) more than others (3). Additionally, simulations illustrate that direct competition between strains (inside the host’s gut) is not a prerequisite for the sudden switching that has been observed in prevailing ribotypes; previously dominant C. difficile strains can be excluded by hypervirulent ribotypes through indirect (exploitative) competition.
Keyword Clostridium difficile
Epidemiological model
Endemic strains
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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