Integrating life history traits and forest structure to evaluate the vulnerability of rainforest birds along gradients of deforestation and fragmentation in eastern Australia

Pavlacky, David C., Possingham, Hugh P. and Goldizen, Anne W. (2015) Integrating life history traits and forest structure to evaluate the vulnerability of rainforest birds along gradients of deforestation and fragmentation in eastern Australia. Biological Conservation, 188 89-99. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2014.10.020


Author Pavlacky, David C.
Possingham, Hugh P.
Goldizen, Anne W.
Title Integrating life history traits and forest structure to evaluate the vulnerability of rainforest birds along gradients of deforestation and fragmentation in eastern Australia
Journal name Biological Conservation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-3207
1873-2917
Publication date 2015-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2014.10.020
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 188
Start page 89
End page 99
Total pages 11
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The management of rainforest ecosystems for multi-species conservation must assess the impacts of habitat degradation at different spatial scales as well as determine which species are vulnerable to landscape change. Our research objectives were to (1) evaluate the effects of life history traits on the patch occupancy and vulnerability of rainforest birds, (2) determine the relative effects of stand, landscape and patch structure on species richness, and (3) evaluate the relative contributions of deforestation and fragmentation to species richness. We collected presence–absence data for 29 bird species in 46 rainforest patches in South East Queensland, Australia. We used a multi-species occupancy model that accounted for incomplete detection to evaluate hypotheses for occupancy and species richness. Avian occupancy was strongly influenced by life history traits, including population density, foraging behavior, dispersal strategy, clutch size, body mass and diet. Sedentary species with low population sizes, low clutch sizes, large body sizes and insectivorous diets, such as the ground-dwelling Albert’s Lyrebird (Menura alberti) and canopy-dwelling Paradise Riflebird (Ptiloris paradiseus), were the most vulnerable to landscape change. After accounting for life history, the positive effect of stand basal area was the best predictor of species richness followed by the positive effects of rainforest and dry eucalypt forest in the landscape, with less support for the positive effect of patch size and negative effect of patch isolation. Deforestation was more detrimental to the bird community than rainforest fragmentation. Conservation actions that retain high stand basal area, promote unmodified landscape mosaics and maintain moderate patch sizes near large rainforest tracts are expected to be effective strategies for managing the rainforest bird community. Landscape conservation strategies to minimize habitat loss are expected to be more effective than managing the configuration of rainforest patches.
Keyword Community ecology
Deforestation
Gondwana rainforests of Australia
Landscape ecology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 11 Aug 2015, 00:25:54 EST by System User on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service