Sociocultural change facing ranchers in the Rocky Mountain West as a result of mountain resort tourism and amenity migration

Ooi, Natalie, Laing, Jennifer and Mair, Judith (2015) Sociocultural change facing ranchers in the Rocky Mountain West as a result of mountain resort tourism and amenity migration. Journal of Rural Studies, 41 59-71. doi:10.1016/j.jrurstud.2015.07.005

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Author Ooi, Natalie
Laing, Jennifer
Mair, Judith
Title Sociocultural change facing ranchers in the Rocky Mountain West as a result of mountain resort tourism and amenity migration
Journal name Journal of Rural Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0743-0167
1873-1392
Publication date 2015-10
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jrurstud.2015.07.005
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 41
Start page 59
End page 71
Total pages 13
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract In response to rural restructuring, many communities throughout the Rocky Mountain West have shifted from extractive and land-intensive industries to service-based economies, contributing to significant socio-cultural change for local residents, including ranchers. This exploratory study uses social capital as a heuristic device to examine ranchers' perspectives on the way in which mountain resort tourism and amenity migration have affected their patterns of socialization in the ranchlands surrounding Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Findings indicate the importance of both formal and informal bonding and bridging networks within the ranching community. While the introduction of amenity migrants and their differing perceptions on land ownership and management appear to have affected opportunities for informal rancher social interaction, both amongst one another and with their new neighbors, they seem to have encouraged ranchers to band together to protect their livelihoods through informal collective efforts and the formal creation of bridging networks. This indicates that conflict can instigate social capital development and contribute to positive outcomes, such as empowerment and grassroots democracy. Mountain resort tourism and amenity migration therefore appear to present both opportunities and challenges that are altering the nature of rancher social interactions, but not necessarily diminishing their social capital.
Keyword Mountain resort tourism
Social capital
Ranching
Community acquired
Ethnography
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 10 Aug 2015, 10:03:36 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School