Environmental contamination and hospital acquired infection: factors that are easily overlooked

Beggs, C., Knibbs, L. D., Johnson, G. and Morawska, L. (2015) Environmental contamination and hospital acquired infection: factors that are easily overlooked. Indoor Air, 25 5: 462-474. doi:10.1111/ina.12170


Author Beggs, C.
Knibbs, L. D.
Johnson, G.
Morawska, L.
Title Environmental contamination and hospital acquired infection: factors that are easily overlooked
Journal name Indoor Air   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0905-6947
1600-0668
Publication date 2015-10-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/ina.12170
Volume 25
Issue 5
Start page 462
End page 474
Total pages 13
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
There is an ongoing debate about the reasons for and factors contributing to healthcare-associated infection (HAI). Different solutions have been proposed over time to control the spread of HAI, with more focus on hand hygiene than on other aspects such as preventing the aerial dissemination of bacteria. Yet, it emerges that there is a need for a more pluralistic approach to infection control; one that reflects the complexity of the systems associated with HAI and involves multidisciplinary teams including hospital doctors, infection control nurses, microbiologists, architects, and engineers with expertise in building design and facilities management. This study reviews the knowledge base on the role that environmental contamination plays in the transmission of HAI, with the aim of raising awareness regarding infection control issues that are frequently overlooked. From the discussion presented in the study, it is clear that many unknowns persist regarding aerial dissemination of bacteria, and its control via cleaning and disinfection of the clinical environment. There is a paucity of good-quality epidemiological data, making it difficult for healthcare authorities to develop evidence-based policies. Consequently, there is a strong need for carefully designed studies to determine the impact of environmental contamination on the spread of HAI.
Keyword Healthcare associated infection
Aerial dissemination
Environmental Contamination
Hospital microbiome
Duct cleaning
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 01 Aug 2015, 09:23:32 EST by Luke Knibbs on behalf of School of Public Health