Is the association between temperature and mortality modified by age, gender and socio-economic status?

Yu, Weiwei, Vaneckova, Pavia, Mengersen, Kerrie, Pan, Xiaochuan and Tong, Shilu (2010) Is the association between temperature and mortality modified by age, gender and socio-economic status?. Science of the Total Environment, 408 17: 3513-3518. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2010.04.058


Author Yu, Weiwei
Vaneckova, Pavia
Mengersen, Kerrie
Pan, Xiaochuan
Tong, Shilu
Title Is the association between temperature and mortality modified by age, gender and socio-economic status?
Journal name Science of the Total Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0048-9697
Publication date 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2010.04.058
Volume 408
Issue 17
Start page 3513
End page 3518
Total pages 6
Language eng
Subject 2304 Environmental Chemistry
2310 Pollution
2311 Waste Management and Disposal
2305 Environmental Engineering
2700 Medicine
Abstract Background: A number of studies have examined the relationship between high ambient temperature and mortality. Recently, concern has arisen about whether this relationship is modified by socio-demographic factors. However, data for this type of study is relatively scarce in subtropical/tropical regions where people are well accustomed to warm temperatures. Objective: To investigate whether the relationship between daily mean temperature and daily all-cause mortality is modified by age, gender and socio-economic status (SES) in Brisbane, Australia. Methods: We obtained daily mean temperature and all-cause mortality data for Brisbane, Australia during 1996-2004. A generalised additive model was fitted to assess the percentage increase in all deaths with every one degree increment above the threshold temperature. Different age, gender and SES groups were included in the model as categorical variables and their modification effects were estimated separately. Results: A total of 53,316 non-external deaths were included during the study period. There was a clear increasing trend in the harmful effect of high temperature on mortality with age. The effect estimate among women was more than 20 times that among men. We did not find an SES effect on the percent increase associated with temperature. Conclusions: The effects of high temperature on all deaths were modified by age and gender but not by SES in Brisbane, Australia.
Keyword Age
Effect modification
Gender
Mortality
Socio-economic status
Temperature
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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