The impact of heatwaves on mortality in Australia: A multicity study

Tong, Shilu, Wang, Xiao Yu, Yu, Weiwei, Chen, Dong and Wang, Xiaoming (2014) The impact of heatwaves on mortality in Australia: A multicity study. BMJ Open, 4 2: . doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003579


Author Tong, Shilu
Wang, Xiao Yu
Yu, Weiwei
Chen, Dong
Wang, Xiaoming
Title The impact of heatwaves on mortality in Australia: A multicity study
Journal name BMJ Open   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2044-6055
Publication date 2014-02-18
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003579
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 4
Issue 2
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher B M J Group
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives To assess the heterogeneity of heatwave-related impacts on mortality across different cities.

Design A multicity time series study.

Setting 3 largest Australian cities: Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney.

Participants All residents living in these cities.

Main outcome measures Non-external causes mortality data by gender and two age groups (ie, 0–75 and 75+) for these cities during the period 1988–2009 were obtained from relevant government agencies.

Results Total mortality increased mostly within the same day (lag 0) or a lag of 1 day (lag 1) during almost all heatwaves in three cities. Using the heatwave definition (HWD) as the 95th centile of mean temperature for two or more consecutive days in the summer season, the relative risk for total mortality at lag 1 in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney was 1.13 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.19), 1.10 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.14) and 1.06 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.10), respectively. Using the more stringent HWD—the 99th centile of mean temperature for two or more consecutive days, the relative risk of total mortality at the lags of 0–2 days in Brisbane and Melbourne was 1.40 (95% CI 1.29 to 1.51) and 1.47 (95% CI 1.36 to 1.59), respectively. Elderly, particularly females, were more vulnerable to the impact of heatwaves.

Conclusions A consistent and significant increase in mortality was observed during heatwaves in the three largest Australian cities, but the impacts of heatwave appeared to vary with age, gender, the HWD and geographical area.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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