Problem of positioning Paleogene Eurasia: a review, efforts to resolve the issue, implications for the India-Asia collision

Ali, Jason R. and Aitchison, Jonathan C. (2004). Problem of positioning Paleogene Eurasia: a review, efforts to resolve the issue, implications for the India-Asia collision. In P. Clift, W. Kuhnt, P. Wang and D. Hayes (Ed.), Continent–ocean interactions within the East Asia marginal seas (pp. 23-35) USA: American Geophysical Union Monograph Series. doi:10.1029/149GM02


Author Ali, Jason R.
Aitchison, Jonathan C.
Title of chapter Problem of positioning Paleogene Eurasia: a review, efforts to resolve the issue, implications for the India-Asia collision
Title of book Continent–ocean interactions within the East Asia marginal seas
Place of Publication USA
Publisher American Geophysical Union Monograph Series
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1029/149GM02
Series Geophysical Monograph Series
ISBN 9780875904146
9781118666067
Editor P. Clift
W. Kuhnt
P. Wang
D. Hayes
Volume number 149
Chapter number 2
Start page 23
End page 35
Total pages 19
Total chapters 17
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Limitations with the 'stable Eurasia' paleomagnetic database (temporal and geographic coverage) create problems for tracing the Paleogene and Cretaceous position of Earth's largest continental plate. Consequently, modeling its punctuated
growth and assessing the associated tectonic processes, including basin formation along the southeastern and eastern margins, is hampered. A solution is presented in the form of a hybrid early Paleogene paleomagnetic pole (72.0°N, 177.9°E, A95 =7.9°) derived from three sets of newly generated data; 58-55 Ma and 50 ± 15 Ma basaltic lavas respectively from the Faroe Islands and Kyrgyzstan, and ~52 Ma sedimentary rocks from southern England. The India-Asia collision model is reviewed in light of the new stable Eurasia pole, seismic tomography data from the mantle below the Indian Ocean-Central Asia region, and recently published, largely field-based, data from the Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture Zone, Tibet.

We suggest firstly that between 65-55 Ma India collided with an equatorially located intra-oceanic arc.

Secondly, India continued to move north, although at a slower rate, eventually colliding with Eurasia ~30 Ma.

Thirdly, as a result of the collision, maximum shortening in Tibet was probably around 700 km. The principal benefit of a late Paleogene India-Asia collision concerns the reduced time between causal-event and orogenic response in East-SE Asia (the early-contact model, has a delay of >20 m.y., for example initiation of the Red River Fault). The late-collision scenario overcomes this problem, the response time being more similar to the young-active orogens operating today
(e.g., Central Japan, Taiwan, New Guinea and Timor)
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 29 Jul 2015, 13:48:16 EST by Helen Smith on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management