Reliability of a cycle ergometer peak power test in running-based team sport athletes: a technical report

Wehbe, George M., Gabbett, Tim J., Hartwig, Timothy B. and McLellan, Christopher P. (2015) Reliability of a cycle ergometer peak power test in running-based team sport athletes: a technical report. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 29 7: 2050-2055. doi:10.1519/JSC.0000000000000814


Author Wehbe, George M.
Gabbett, Tim J.
Hartwig, Timothy B.
McLellan, Christopher P.
Title Reliability of a cycle ergometer peak power test in running-based team sport athletes: a technical report
Journal name Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1064-8011
1533-4287
Publication date 2015-07-11
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000814
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 29
Issue 7
Start page 2050
End page 2055
Total pages 6
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Given the importance of ensuring athletes train and compete in a nonfatigued state, reliable tests are required to regularly monitor fatigue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of a cycle ergometer to measure peak power during short maximal sprint cycle efforts in running-based team sport athletes. Fourteen professional male Australian rules footballers performed a sprint cycle protocol during 3 separate trials, with each trial separated by 7 days. The protocol consisted of a standardized warm-up, a maximal 6-second sprint cycle effort, a 1-minute active recovery, and a second maximal 6-second sprint cycle effort. Peak power was recorded as the highest power output of the 2 sprint cycle efforts. Absolute peak power (mean ± SD) was 1502 ± 202, 1498 ± 191, and 1495 ± 210 W for trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The mean coefficient of variation, intraclass correlation coefficient, and SE of measurement for peak power between trials was 3.0% (90% confidence intervals [CIs] = 2.5–3.8%), 0.96 (90% CIs = 0.91–0.98), and 39 W, respectively. The smallest worthwhile change for relative peak power was 6.0%, which equated to 1.03 W·kg-1. The cycle ergometer sprint test protocol described in this study is highly reliable in elite Australian rules footballers and can be used to track meaningful changes in performance over time, making it a potentially useful fatigue-monitoring tool.
Keyword Fatigue
Football
Performance
Recovery
Testing
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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