The influence of triclosan on biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in patients in the Cardiovascular and Periodontal Study (CAPS): a randomized controlled trial

Cullinan, Mary P., Palmer, Janet E., Faddy, Malcom J., Westerman, Bill, Carle, Anne D., West, Malcom J. and Seymour, Gregory J. (2015) The influence of triclosan on biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in patients in the Cardiovascular and Periodontal Study (CAPS): a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Periodontology, 86 7: 847-855. doi:10.1902/jop.2015.140716


Author Cullinan, Mary P.
Palmer, Janet E.
Faddy, Malcom J.
Westerman, Bill
Carle, Anne D.
West, Malcom J.
Seymour, Gregory J.
Title The influence of triclosan on biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in patients in the Cardiovascular and Periodontal Study (CAPS): a randomized controlled trial
Journal name Journal of Periodontology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3492
1943-3670
Publication date 2015-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1902/jop.2015.140716
Volume 86
Issue 7
Start page 847
End page 855
Total pages 9
Publisher American Academy of Periodontology
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Triclosan toothpaste is effective in controlling plaque and gingivitis and slowing progression of periodontitis; however, its influence on inflammatory biomarkers of cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as on kidney and liver function, is unknown.

Methods: Patients recruited from the Cardiovascular Unit at Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, were randomized to triclosan (n = 193) or placebo (n = 190) groups and assessed for total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), hemoglobin, total white cell count (WCC), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and liver function enzymes, annually for 5 years. A standard mixed model for each marker included group, sex, age, hypertension, diabetes, periodontal status, statin and anti-inflammatory drug use, and smoking as covariates. Changes in eGFR, WCC, and ESR were further analyzed using transition modeling.

Results: Triclosan toothpaste led to a greater decrease in TC (P = 0.03), LDL cholesterol (P = 0.04), and HDL cholesterol (P = 0.05) than placebo toothpaste. ESR increased at a slower rate in the triclosan group (P ≈ 0.06) and was less likely to increase and more likely to improve in males on statins but not anti-inflammatory drugs in the triclosan group versus the placebo group. Markov modeling of the binary response for eGFR (greater than or less than/equal to the baseline median value) showed that patients with diabetes in the placebo group were significantly (P ≈ 0.05) more likely to deteriorate than either patients with diabetes in the triclosan group or patients without diabetes in each group.

Conclusions: These data suggest that triclosan toothpaste may influence some inflammatory biomarkers of CVD, but not kidney or liver function. However, it is unclear if this influence is clinically significant.
Keyword Biological markers
Cardiovascular diseases
Glomerular filtration rate
Liver function tests
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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