Deconstructing the power resistance relationship for squats: a joint-level analysis

Farris, D. J., Lichtwark, G. A., Brown, N. A. T. and Cresswell, A. G. (2016) Deconstructing the power resistance relationship for squats: a joint-level analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 26 7: 774-781. doi:10.1111/sms.12508

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Author Farris, D. J.
Lichtwark, G. A.
Brown, N. A. T.
Cresswell, A. G.
Title Deconstructing the power resistance relationship for squats: a joint-level analysis
Journal name Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0905-7188
1600-0838
Publication date 2016-07
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/sms.12508
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 26
Issue 7
Start page 774
End page 781
Total pages 8
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Generating high leg power outputs is important for executing rapid movements. Squats are commonly used to increase leg strength and power. Therefore, it is useful to understand factors affecting power output in squatting. We aimed to deconstruct the mechanisms behind why power is maximized at certain resistances in squatting. Ten male rowers (age = 20 ± 2.2 years; height = 1.82 ± 0.03 m; mass = 86 ± 11 kg) performed maximal power squats with resistances ranging from body weight to 80% of their one repetition maximum (1RM). Three-dimensional kinematics was combined with ground reaction force (GRF) data in an inverse dynamics analysis to calculate leg joint moments and powers. System center of mass (COM) velocity and power were computed from GRF data. COM power was maximized across a range of resistances from 40% to 60% 1RM. This range was identified because a trade-off in hip and knee joint powers existed across this range, with maximal knee joint power occurring at 40% 1RM and maximal hip joint power at 60% 1RM. A non-linear system force–velocity relationship was observed that dictated large reductions in COM power below 20% 1RM and above 60% 1RM. These reductions were due to constraints on the control of the movement.
Keyword Biomechanics
Force velocity
Joint power
Weightlifting
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 24 June 2015

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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