From "we" to "me": group identification enhances perceived personal control with consequences for health and well-being

Greenaway, Katharine H., Haslam, S. Alexander, Cruwys, Tegan, Branscombe, Nyla R. and Ysseldyk, Renate (2015) From "we" to "me": group identification enhances perceived personal control with consequences for health and well-being. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 109 1: 53-74. doi:10.1037/pspi0000019


Author Greenaway, Katharine H.
Haslam, S. Alexander
Cruwys, Tegan
Branscombe, Nyla R.
Ysseldyk, Renate
Title From "we" to "me": group identification enhances perceived personal control with consequences for health and well-being
Journal name Journal of Personality and Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3514
1939-1315
Publication date 2015-05-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/pspi0000019
Volume 109
Issue 1
Start page 53
End page 74
Total pages 11
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
There is growing recognition that identification with social groups can protect and enhance health and well-being, thereby constituting a kind of “social cure.” The present research explores the role of control as a novel mediator of the relationship between shared group identity and well-being. Five studies provide evidence for this process. Group identification predicted significantly greater perceived personal control across 47 countries (Study 1), and in groups that had experienced success and failure (Study 2). The relationship was observed longitudinally (Study 3) and experimentally (Study 4). Manipulated group identification also buffered a loss of personal control (Study 5). Across the studies, perceived personal control mediated social cure effects in political, academic, community, and national groups. The findings reveal that the personal benefits of social groups come not only from their ability to make people feel good, but also from their ability to make people feel capable and in control of their lives.
Keyword Agency
Efficacy
Group identification
Perceived control
Social identity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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