Concrete Durability in Marine Environment: Early Age Exposure of Standard and Self-Compacting Concrete to Chloride Ions

Bryce, Russel (2002). Concrete Durability in Marine Environment: Early Age Exposure of Standard and Self-Compacting Concrete to Chloride Ions Honours Thesis, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Bryce, Russel
Thesis Title Concrete Durability in Marine Environment: Early Age Exposure of Standard and Self-Compacting Concrete to Chloride Ions
School, Centre or Institute School of Engineering
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2002
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor P Dux
Total pages 54
Language eng
Subjects 0905 Civil Engineering
Formatted abstract
Ever since concrete has been used in the marine environment there has been associated problem of chloride ion intrusion negatively affecting the durability of concrete. This thesis explores the effects of chloride ion intrusion into concrete, where the concrete has been exposed to a chloride rich environment at a very early age.

Different types of concrete including standard and Self-compacting concrete were investigated. The Self-compacting concrete tested included both horizontal and vertical application concrete. Exposure times and the related effects of curing and the positioning of blocks in the tide cycle were also investigated. Laboratory conditions were set up to represent a marine environment, tests completed and the results analysed. Results show that the level of chloride intrusion is significantly dependent on the parameters that were varied and for testing.

It was found that Self-compacting concrete had higher chloride intrusion than standard compaction concrete, in particular vertical application Self-compacting concrete. Curing of concrete was shown to lower the concentration of chloride ions found at all depths. Exposure times showed the later exposure to chloride ions the less intrusion that would occur. The position of blocks in the tide cycle seemed to have little effect on chloride intrusion though results were varied and hence inconclusive.

The results indicate that the safe corrosion concentration will be surpassed at 30mm which is the specified cover in the British Standards after just 3-days, after 28 days the chloride concentration will very close to the safe limit at 50mm which is the specified cover in the Australian Standards. The findings for standard and horizontal Self-compacting concrete weren’t as significant however the corrosion safe limits would be exceeded before the design life of concrete structures if future prediction assumptions were correct.
Keyword Concrete durability

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Thu, 09 Jul 2015, 15:11:53 EST by Asma Asrar Qureshi on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service