Does the way maternity care is provided affect maternal and neonatal outcomes for young women and their babies?

Allen, Jyai, Gamble, Jenny, Stapleton, Helen and Kildea, Sue (2012) Does the way maternity care is provided affect maternal and neonatal outcomes for young women and their babies?. Women and Birth, 25 2: 54-63. doi:10.1016/j.wombi.2011.03.002


Author Allen, Jyai
Gamble, Jenny
Stapleton, Helen
Kildea, Sue
Title Does the way maternity care is provided affect maternal and neonatal outcomes for young women and their babies?
Journal name Women and Birth   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1871-5192
1878-1799
Publication date 2012
Year available 2012
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2011.03.002
Open Access Status
Volume 25
Issue 2
Start page 54
End page 63
Total pages 20
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background
Young pregnant women who continue a pregnancy are primarily from a socioeconomically deprived background. The risk factors associated with low socio-economic status may independently affect perinatal and neonatal morbidity to a greater extent than the young age of the woman. Young pregnant women are frequently sceptical about health care providers who they can perceive to be judgemental. This may lead to late booking for pregnancy care, attending few appointments, or not attending the health service for any antenatal care.

Question
Does the way maternity care is provided affect maternal and neonatal outcomes for young women?

Method
A systematic search of the major health databases.

Results
Nine research articles met the eligibility criteria: one randomised controlled trial, three prospective cohort studies, two comparative studies with concurrent controls, two comparative studies with historical controls, and one case series.

Discussion
Providing young women with a non-standard model of maternity care has some beneficial and no known detrimental effects on childbirth outcomes. While there is a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of a Midwifery Group Practice model of care for young women, there is strong evidence to suggest that a Group Antenatal Care model increases antenatal visit attendance and breastfeeding initiation, and decreases the risk of preterm birth. There is research to indicate that a Young Women's Clinic model may also increase antenatal visit attendance and decrease the incidence of preterm birth.

Conclusion
More well-designed and resourced midwifery models of care for young women should be implemented and rigorously researched.
Keyword Midwifery
Models of care
Pregnancy in adolescence
Group Antenatal Care
Teenage clinic
Midwifery group practice
Teenage Pregnancy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 09 Jul 2015, 14:02:47 EST by Jyai Allen on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work