The relationship between prospective memory and episodic future thinking in younger and older adulthood

Terrett, Gill, Rose, Nathan S, Henry, Julie D, Bailey, Phoebe E, Altgassen, Mareike, Phillips, Louise H, Kliegel, Matthias and Rendell, Peter G (2015) The relationship between prospective memory and episodic future thinking in younger and older adulthood. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 2: 310-323. doi:10.1080/17470218.2015.1054294


Author Terrett, Gill
Rose, Nathan S
Henry, Julie D
Bailey, Phoebe E
Altgassen, Mareike
Phillips, Louise H
Kliegel, Matthias
Rendell, Peter G
Title The relationship between prospective memory and episodic future thinking in younger and older adulthood
Journal name Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1747-0226
1747-0218
Publication date 2015-06-18
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/17470218.2015.1054294
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 69
Issue 2
Start page 310
End page 323
Total pages 14
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Episodic future thinking (EFT), the ability to project into the future to “preexperience” an event, and prospective memory (PM), remembering to perform an intended action, are both examples of future-oriented cognition. Recently it has been suggested that EFT might contribute to PM performance but to date few studies have examined the relationship between these two capacities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the nature and specificity of this relationship, as well as whether it varies with age. Participants were 125 younger and 125 older adults who completed measures of EFT and PM. Significant, positive correlations between EFT and PM were identified in both age groups. Furthermore, EFT ability accounted for significant unique variance in the young adults, suggesting that it may make a specific contribution to PM function. Within the older adult group, EFT did not uniquely contribute to PM, possibly indicating a reduced capacity to utilize EFT, or the use of compensatory strategies. This study is the first to provide systematic evidence for an association between variation in EFT and PM abilities in both younger and older adulthood and shows that the nature of this association varies as a function of age.
Keyword Prospective memory
Episodic future thinking
Autobiographical Interview
Virtual Week
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 07 Jul 2015, 00:16:05 EST by System User on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service