The Baby’s Not for Burning: The Abject in Sarah Kane’s Blasted and Helen Oyeyemi’s Juniper’s Whitening

Harris Satkunananthan, Anita (2015) The Baby’s Not for Burning: The Abject in Sarah Kane’s Blasted and Helen Oyeyemi’s Juniper’s Whitening. 3 L: The Southeast Asian Journal of English Language Studies, 21 2: 17-29.

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Author Harris Satkunananthan, Anita
Title The Baby’s Not for Burning: The Abject in Sarah Kane’s Blasted and Helen Oyeyemi’s Juniper’s Whitening
Journal name 3 L: The Southeast Asian Journal of English Language Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0128-5157
Publication date 2015
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 21
Issue 2
Start page 17
End page 29
Total pages 13
Place of publication Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia
Publisher Penerbit Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Both Sarah Kane’s Blasted and Helen Oyeyemi’s Juniper’s Whitening have frightening instances of theatrical violence which include infanticide. These instances are more overt in Blasted and are alluded to in Juniper’s Whitening. This article interrogates the instances of infanticide within both plays, connecting the violence to the child abuse and farcical infanticide in The Punch and Judy Show. The figure of the child is examined from the perspective of a symbol of civilisation corrupted from within and the murder of the child through the lens of Kristeva’s theory of abjection. The staged infanticide and the rapes present in both texts reflect shifting cultural norms in an increasingly multicultural Britain. The study of these two plays is both literary and dramaturgical;  the casual brutality in Kane’s play with the psychological and insidious motifs in Oyeyemi’s work are compared with the motifs found in The Punch and Judy Show and then situated within the context of the In-yerface
theatre productions of the 1990s to the 2000s. In both plays, a sense of domesticity being a farce underscoring brutality, torture and infanticide is present
Keyword Abiku
Motherhood
In yer face
Abjection
Punch and Judy Show
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes This article stems from the student's postgraduate study (harris1.pdf shows that she brought the publication to her supervisors attention)

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
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Created: Fri, 03 Jul 2015, 10:10:09 EST by Ms Stormy Wehi on behalf of School of Communication and Arts