The synthesis, testing, and a theory on the mode of action of semiochemicals (repellents) for the honey bee

Melksham, Kevin John (1986). The synthesis, testing, and a theory on the mode of action of semiochemicals (repellents) for the honey bee M.Sc Thesis, School of Molecular and Microbial Sciences, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
THE3433.pdf Thesis (fulltext) application/pdf 42.35MB 1
Author Melksham, Kevin John
Thesis Title The synthesis, testing, and a theory on the mode of action of semiochemicals (repellents) for the honey bee
School, Centre or Institute School of Molecular and Microbial Sciences
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1986
Thesis type M.Sc Thesis
Supervisor N. Jacobsen
Total pages 336
Language eng
Subjects 060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified
Formatted abstract
All bees belong to the superfamily Apoidea . The total number of living species in this group has been estimated to be of the order of 20 000 divided into genera of 10 or possibly 11 families. Honey bees belong to the family Apidae. The subfamily Apinae comprises the two highly social group of bees, the meliponines and Apis. The genus Apis is the sole modern representative of the tribe Apini.

The genus Apis comprises four species of true honey bees i.e. those which store considerable quantities of honey. These species are Apis dorsata, the giant honey bee, Apis florea, the little honey bee, Apis indica, the Eastern honey bee, and Apis mellifera L., the Western honey bee . The first three of these occur wild in southern Asia and not elsewhere. Apis mellifera L. is believed to have originated in the African tropics or subtropics about the end of the Tertiary, migrating to the colder climates of Europe prior to its association with man. It has been introduced to almost every country in the world from Europe.

A variety of this honey bee, Apis mellifera unicolor, occurs in Africa. There are numerous European strains which are only races, differing in minor characters, mainly colouration (e.g. a northwestern "black" race (Apis mellifera mellifera), a southwestern "grey" race (Apis mellifera carnica), and an Italian "yellow" race (Apis mellifera ligustica). Only Apis mellifera L. and Apis indica can be kept in hives. All testing was done with Apis mellifera L. since this is the species used for commercial honey production in Australia.
Keyword Honeybee
Insect baits and repellents
Repellents
Additional Notes Other Title: Semiochemicals (repellents) for bees.

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 25 Jun 2015, 09:03:07 EST by Ms Dulcie Stewart on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service