Simulator sickness incidence and susceptibility during neck motion-controlled virtual reality tasks

Treleaven, Julia, Battershill, Jenna, Cole, Deborah, Fadelli, Carissa, Freestone, Simon, Lang, Katie and Sarig-Bahat, Hilla (2015) Simulator sickness incidence and susceptibility during neck motion-controlled virtual reality tasks. Virtual Reality, 19 3-4: 267-275. doi:10.1007/s10055-015-0266-4


Author Treleaven, Julia
Battershill, Jenna
Cole, Deborah
Fadelli, Carissa
Freestone, Simon
Lang, Katie
Sarig-Bahat, Hilla
Title Simulator sickness incidence and susceptibility during neck motion-controlled virtual reality tasks
Journal name Virtual Reality   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1434-9957
1359-4338
Publication date 2015-06-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10055-015-0266-4
Open Access Status
Volume 19
Issue 3-4
Start page 267
End page 275
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Springer UK
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
To determine the incidence, severity, and predisposing factors to simulator sickness (SS) when using the neck virtual reality (VR) device in asymptomatic individuals to understand the risk of provoking SS in the development of neck VR as a rehabilitation tool. Thirty-two participants used the VR system. Postural stability was measured before and after each VR module [range of motion (ROM), velocity, and accuracy]. The duration of each module was recorded, and participants reported their SS using a visual analogue scale (SS–VAS)/100 mm. Following the VR assessment, participants completed the Motion Sickness Susceptibility Questionnaire (MSSQ) (child and adult subsections) and Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ). The incidence of motion sickness during the VR immersion was 28 %, and the mean severity was 17.2 mm on VAS. There was a significant difference in ROM time, total time, MSSQ score, and SSQ score (p < 0.05) between those who reported any level of SS–VAS and those with no SS–VAS. The SS–VAS score displayed significant positive correlations with SSQ score, change in postural stability time pre to post, ROM time, and total time. Results indicate a relatively high incidence but low severity of SS which was associated with the MSSQ child subsection score and exposure time.
Keyword Virtual reality
Motion sickness
Velocity
Neck
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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