Legitimacy faultlines in international society: the responsibility to protect and prosecute after Libya

Ralph, Jason and Gallagher, Adrian (2015) Legitimacy faultlines in international society: the responsibility to protect and prosecute after Libya. Review of International Studies, 41 3: 553-573. doi:10.1017/S0260210514000242


Author Ralph, Jason
Gallagher, Adrian
Title Legitimacy faultlines in international society: the responsibility to protect and prosecute after Libya
Journal name Review of International Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-9044
0260-2105
Publication date 2015-07-26
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0260210514000242
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 41
Issue 3
Start page 553
End page 573
Total pages 21
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
There is a perceived legitimacy deficit in contemporary international society. A symptom of this is the political contestation surrounding the 2011 Libyan crisis and its influence on the 2011–13 Syrian crisis. This involved criticism being levelled at the coalition led by the so-called Permanent-3 for the way they implemented the protection of civilians mandate, as well as for the referral of the Libyan situation to the International Criminal Court. How the P3 respond to these developments will be driven in part by how this ‘legitimacy fault line’ is interpreted. The purpose of this article is to first give an interpretation that is informed by the work of contemporary English School scholars and the political theorists they draw on; and second to provide the context in which specific policy recommendations may guide the response of the P3 states. We argue that because the new legitimacy fault line divides on the procedural question of who decides how international society should meet its responsibilities rather than substantive disagreements about what those responsibilities are (that is, human protection and justice) the challenge to the liberal agenda of the P3 is not radical. However, we also argue that ignoring the procedural concerns of the African and BRICS states is not outcome neutral and could in fact do harm to both the ICC and the wider implementation of R2P. We consider two proposals for procedural reform and examine how the P3 response would impact on their claim to be good international citizens.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Political Science and International Studies Publications
 
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