Depression and the incidence of urinary incontinence symptoms among young women: results from a prospective cohort study

Mishra, Gita D., Barker, Megan S., Herber-Gast, Gerrie-Cor and Hillard, Tim (2015) Depression and the incidence of urinary incontinence symptoms among young women: results from a prospective cohort study. Maturitas, 81 4: 456-461. doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2015.05.006

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Author Mishra, Gita D.
Barker, Megan S.
Herber-Gast, Gerrie-Cor
Hillard, Tim
Title Depression and the incidence of urinary incontinence symptoms among young women: results from a prospective cohort study
Journal name Maturitas   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-4111
0378-5122
Publication date 2015
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2015.05.006
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 81
Issue 4
Start page 456
End page 461
Total pages 6
Place of publication Shannon, Clare, Ireland
Publisher Elsevier Ireland
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective

To examine the association of depressive symptoms with subsequent urinary incontinence (UI) symptoms among young women.

Subjects and methods

Data were from a cohort of 5391 young women (born 1973–1978) from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Generalised Estimating Equations (GEEs) were used to link depressive symptoms, and history of doctor diagnosed depression at Survey 2 (S2) in 2000 with the incidence of UI symptoms in subsequent surveys (from S3 in 2003 to S6 in 2012).

Results

24% of women reported the incidence of UI over the nine-year study period, while the prevalence rose over time from 6.8% (at S2, aged 22–27 years) to 16.5% (at S6, aged 34–39). From univariable GEE analysis, women with depressive symptoms or a history of depression were more likely to report subsequent UI symptoms. This remained after adjusting for socio-demographic, body mass index, health behaviours and reproductive factors, with depressive symptoms associated with 37% higher odds (odds ratio 1.37, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.61) and history of depression with 42% higher odds (1.42, 1.17 to 1.74) of incidence of UI.

Conclusions

When woman seek treatment for UI symptoms, health professionals should consider her current or history of depression.
Keyword Urinary incontinence symptoms
Depression
Cohort study
Young women
Epidemiology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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